INVENTORY OF CEMETERIES AT RISK

(Estrie, Montérégie, Laurentides, Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, and Outaouais)

Cemetery Heritage Inventory and Restoration Initiative (CHIRI)
Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network

Edited by Matthew Farfan
(March 31, 2008)

Copyright 2008, QAHN,
400-257 Queen Street,
Sherbrooke (Lennoxville), Quebec J1M 1K7

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

SECTION PAGE
Acknowledgements 3
introduction 4
Methodology 5
Problems Observed by Fieldworkers 7
Recommendations 12
Findings 15
Cemeteries at Risk: Evaluation Forms 18
Estrie 19
Asbestos 20
Coaticook 23
Le Granit 104
Le Haut-Saint-François 131
Le Val Saint-François 151
Memphrémagog 169
Extinct Cemeteries, Estrie 250
Montérégie 282
Brome-Missisquoi 283
La Haute-Yamaska 364
Le Haut-Richelieu 370
Extinct Cemeteries, Montérégie 379
Laurentides 383
Argenteuil 384
La Rivière-du-Nord 405
Les Laurentides 420
Les Pays-d’en-Haut 429
Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean 432
Le Fjord-du-Saguenay 433
Outaouais 445
Papineau 446
Appendix: Instructions to Inventory Takers 449

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

The Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions of both the Department of Canadian Heritage and Townshippers’ Research and Cultural Foundation towards the completion of this inventory.

The following persons and organizations have been instrumental in compiling information for this study. Without their diligent research, fieldwork, background information and directional assistance, this project would not have been possible: Judy Antle, Isabell MacArthur Beattie, Keith Bennett, Jeanie Boutin, Wells Coates, Nelson and Barbara Couvrette, Joan Cruickshank, Cathy Curtis, Heather Darch, Marilyn Davis, Sylvia Fendle, John Fowles, Elaine Fuller, Esther and Don Healy, Jim Kyle, Adelaide Lanktree, Janet Burns Laroche, Harold Linton, Milt and Bev Loomis, Peter Marshall, Megantic-Compton Cemetery and Church Association (MCCCA), Missisquoi Historical Society (MHS), Russell Nichols, Leslie Nutbrown, (the late) Phil Poaps, Potton Heritage Association (PHA), Kevin Pryce, Richmond County Historical Society (RCHS), Stuart Shea, Stanstead Historical Society (SHS), Sandra Stock, Margaret Vokey, Serge Wagner and Elaine Wilson.

INTRODUCTION:

In October 2007, QAHN launched its Cemetery Heritage Inventory and Restoration Initiative ( CHIRI). A key component of this initiative was an inventory of cemeteries historically connected to English-speaking communities in four regions of Quebec and deemed to be “at risk.”

The following is a brief overview of the methodology used in conducting this inventory, the problems observed by researchers at the various cemeteries they visited, and QAHN’s recommendations for solving some of these problems. We then present a summary of our findings, by region, followed by the individual evaluations themselves. These are organized by region, with each region ordered alphabetically by MRC and by cemetery name.


METHODOLOGY

:

SCOPE:

The regions targeted in this inventory were Estrie; Montérégie; Laurentides; and Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean. Additional data was also collected for the Outaouais.

EVALUATION FORM:

Before undertaking this inventory, we first had to develop a standardized evaluation form. We wanted something that could be applied to cemeteries of all types and sizes, publicly or privately owned, across Quebec. Researchers could then use this form as a template for entering data and rating cemeteries according to a common set of variables.

We wanted researchers to record as much information as possible for each cemetery. The evaluation form therefore had to include both descriptive detail, such as name and location of the cemetery, name of the proprietor and/or custodian, historical background, current status, date of first and last burial, and so on; and a grading system whereby everything from the legibility of inscriptions, to the quality of gravestone repairs, to the condition of fences could be recorded.

A key component of the evaluation form was the numerical grading system, whereby cemeteries could be graded on a scale of 1 to 100 points. Cemeteries with a grade of less than 50 points would be considered “at risk.” (See Appendices 1 & 2).

CEMETERY RESEARCHERS:

Because the geographic scope of this study was so broad, we needed to enlist the help of researchers in the different regions. Researchers would conduct fieldwork and report back to CHIRI project leader Matthew Farfan.

Heather Darch and Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society) were recruited from Montérégie; Sandra Stock (Morin Heights Historical Association) conducted fieldwork in the Laurentians (with additional sites in the Outaouais); and Leslie Nutbrown and Matthew Farfan evaluated cemeteries in Estrie and Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean. Many other individuals and organizations provided additional leads, background, grading information and directions to “at risk” cemeteries. The names of researchers and their sources of information are included with each completed cemetery evaluation form.

FIELDWORK:

Field research took place between October 2007 and March 2008, with the bulk of it carried out before the early snow curtailed cemetery visits in November. Researchers visited cemeteries in their areas, taking notes and photographs and collecting background information whenever possible. When visits proved impractical, findings were based on reliable first-hand information. Additional research on some cemeteries was conducted throughout the winter.

Once completed, cemetery evaluations, supplemented in many cases with comments from the researchers and photographs, were submitted to the project leader. They were then double-checked for accuracy and consistency (vis-à-vis other completed cemetery evaluations), with occasional minor adjustments being made to numerical grades when these seemed either too high or two low. In this way, consistency was maintained throughout the process, compensating for differences of approach among researchers and for the subjectivity that inevitably enters any personal evaluation. A WORK IN PROGRESS:

The scope of this project has been vast and the inventory is not exhaustive. For example, the Châteauguay Valley and surrounding areas of southwest Quebec – a region thought to contain no fewer than 200 cemeteries – have not yet been included. Snow also put an early halt to cemetery visits, so some areas (e.g., Missisquoi) have yet to be completed. In addition, people are still reporting the existence of burial grounds that they feel should be included in our inventory. So, this inventory should really be considered a work in progress.

It should also be remembered that conditions at any given cemetery may improve (or deteriorate) at a future date. Therefore, this inventory should be seen as a “snapshot” at this particular point in time.

PROBLEMS OBSERVED BY FIELDWORKERS:

1) LACK OF PERSONNEL:

Probably the main problem facing the cemeteries we have classified as being at risk is an aging population and a dwindling pool of committed, local, able-bodied volunteers. In some cases, communities that were once vibrant are dying out or have already disappeared, leaving cemeteries with no one to look after them in the vicinity, and few people with family connections to people buried there.

Cemeteries that once had active associations managing them are now being overseen by a handful (at best) of senior citizens. In some cases, surviving trustees live outside the area, often at an extreme distance, limiting their involvement in the cemetery to almost nil. In cases where communities have died out, meetings and maintenance are sporadic, with cemeteries falling into neglect or abandonment. These problems are acute in the Laurentians and Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, as well as in parts of Estrie and Montérégie, where the English-speaking population is diminishing.

2) PUBLIC INDIFFERENCE / LACK OF RESPECT:

A problem noted by many of the people we spoke to is the sheer lack of interest in cemeteries among the general population, and among the younger generation especially. At some cemeteries, indifference has mutated into a more active disregard. In such cases, cemeteries are no longer seen as the sacred places they were meant to be; nor as oases of peace and contemplation; nor as heritage sites to be preserved. They are dark places at the fringes of society, places to avoid, places to vandalize, places to forget…

Contributing to this state of affairs are a number of factors: the marginalization of religion in society; a widespread unease with the subject of death and the rituals associated with it; urbanization (with the resulting decline in the rural population and a loss of connection to rural spaces among city dwellers); an increased mobility among the population (people are much less likely than before to live in one place all their lives); and the devotion of available free time to family, popular entertainment and other interests (as opposed to charitable pursuits).

An aggravating factor in areas where the English population has been replaced by a French one is the fact that people are much less likely to feel a connection to a cemetery to which they have no familial or historic ties.

Added to all of these things is the fact that history and heritage have traditionally appealed to the older generation. And cemetery management definitely tends to draw from this segment of the population.

3) ORGANIZATIONAL PROBLEMS:

Another problem that we have identified, and one that is connected to the above-mentioned issues, is the lack of, or poor, organization found in many traditionally Anglophone cemeteries in Quebec. Far too many cemeteries hold meetings only occasionally – such as when a major expense needs approval or when a board member quits or dies. Basic grass cutting (and little more) is the priority, and this at the expense of gravestone repair. Caretaking duties are contracted out or performed by volunteers, with no thought to long-term planning. The result is that many cemeteries simply muddle through, doing the minimum possible, with little or no effort to recruit new members, raise funds, or plan for the future. Indeed, we have even cemetery associations with sizeable endowments that are still reluctant to spend their money on long overdue repairs. The purse strings are kept tightly fastened, while all the while the gravestones are falling apart -- left where they fall or placed somewhere at the edge of the graveyard for someone else to deal with at some future date which, of course, never arrives.

In some cases, cemetery associations have become dormant, existing only on paper. The president and secretary may continue (in name) in their functions for years at a time without being replaced. Little if any business is conducted, however, and eventually the association lapses.

Surprisingly, organization is a problem even when a church (United or Anglican, for example) is the owner of the cemetery. We have found that there is a profound indifference among many church officials towards the cemeteries under their care, and an unwillingness to invest in the upkeep of cemetery properties and gravestones. Church attendance is diminishing, and with it, revenue. So, quite understandably, church officials are reluctant to part with the meager income they have, which they feel would be better spent on church (not cemetery) upkeep. Cemeteries are a much lower priority than church buildings.

This lack of interest is even more acute where congregations (and church buildings) have disappeared, leaving only the cemetery as a reminder of the church’s presence in the area. In some cases, church officials have no knowledge of the existence of cemeteries under their charge.

4) PRIVATE OWNERSHIP:

Many cemeteries, particularly in the older parts of Estrie and Montérégie, are situated on private property. Like other types of private property, these cemeteries – for the most part family or neighbourhood burial grounds that never had cadastral numbers, legal servitudes, or cemetery associations attached to them – belong to those who hold title to them.

Private ownership of cemeteries raises a host of questions. Is public access enshrined in the deeds? Is it at least tolerated by the landowners? Is anyone caring for the cemetery? If so, how are the gravestones and grounds being maintained? Is there a desire on the part of the owner to maintain the cemetery? Is the cemetery seen by the owner as a heritage site or as a place worthy of dignity? If not, what recourse, if any, do descendants of those buried there (or the general public) have?

5) POOR OR NON-EXISTENT CONSERVATION PRACTICES:

An almost universal problem (with a handful of exceptions) is the fact that there is very little – if any – conservation being done on old gravestones. What conservation is being carried out is usually of an amateur, slipshod nature. Commonly, cements or epoxies are applied badly and with no knowledge of the long-term effects such treatments will have on gravestones or on the aesthetic qualities of the cemetery as a whole.

There is a general lack of technical knowledge about how to repair broken gravestones so that repairs will last, so that they will not do more damage than good, and so that they will be aesthetically pleasing. Some of the repair methods popular a century ago have proven quite detrimental to gravestones over the long term; the same may be true of modern methods that are not properly applied. Simply put, cemetery caretakers are at a loss about what to do, and where to turn for guidance.

Another disturbing practice is the consolidation of stones into straight, easy-to-mow rows, or into cement cairns. Removal of stones from their gravesites destroys their historic context and does irreparable damage to the heritage value of the cemetery. We have observed this practice at a number of cemeteries in Estrie and Montérégie. No doubt, in some instances, it was done as a last resort, as a means of salvaging stones that had already become separated from their original gravesites. But it has also been done as a way of facilitating cemetery maintenance.

In general, cemeteries are seen more as simply repositories of the dead and not so much (as they should be) as heritage sites worthy of preservation. So the stones they contain are not given the respect, and are not as jealously conserved as they would be if these sites were appreciated more for their historic value.

6) VANDALISM AND THEFT:

Vandalism and theft are sporadic at some cemeteries; inexistent at others. And there seems to be no direct correlation between a cemetery’s isolation (or its proximity to human activity) and the likelihood (or not) of it becoming a target. A cemetery may be situated in the heart of a village and surrounded by homes on a well-lit street. Or it may be found on an isolated back road, kilometers from any house or light. In either case, it may be targeted. Paradoxically, each of these types of situations may help to protect it from attack.

Two observations may be noted here. First, vandalism is conducted at night and usually in the darker recesses of the cemetery. Second, it usually involves youths with too much time on their hands. Lights and houses are good deterrents. So are police. But of course, if no one knows a cemetery is there, it likely won’t be “hit” – meaning that privately owned cemeteries located far from the road are strangely the most immune – at least from vandalism (if not theft or encroachment).

7) THE NATURAL ELEMENTS:

Cemeteries that have become neglected for any period of time quickly fall prey to the natural elements. Trees and vegetation tend to encroach in just a few short years. Larger trees can do quite a bit of damage if their roots and trunks are permitted to grow too close to gravestones. It is not uncommon to see gravestones in long untended cemeteries embedded in the trunks of trees. Falling branches can do damage, as well, shattering a gravestone in an instant. And gravestones that are allowed to fall over without being righted are covered by grass and eventually by rotting vegetation. Over time, these stones become saturated with moisture and crumble.

8) POLLUTION:

Air pollution is most often a problem in cemeteries situated close to large urban or industrial centres or along major highways. Blackened or eroded stone is a symptom of this problem.

9) ENCROACHMENT / DEVELOPMENT:

Encroachment by neighbouring property owners is a problem that occurs most often when cemeteries appear untended for any length of time, and particularly when they are unfenced.

Encroachment, may not be immediately apparent. In some cases, it occurs in increments; in others, at a quicker pace. We have seen examples of farmers moving gravestones so that they could increase their acreage under cultivation. In at least one case, a farmer shifted inwards an entire fence surrounding a cemetery in the middle of his field so that the area enclosed was considerably smaller than it was at the start. Indeed, there are cases where entire cemeteries -- usually old family burial grounds -- have disappeared altogether, bulldozed and forgotten forever.

The problem is not restricted to graveyards on private property. A case in point is the enclaved Hill Top Cemetery in Fitch Bay, which dates back to the early 1800s. This cemetery, although it has been completely abandoned for years, nevertheless has its own distinct lot. This, however, has not stopped homeowners in a nearby sub-development from extending their lawns into the grounds and pilfering slate gravestones for use as front steps or as lawn ornaments. The theft of gravestones for use as paving stones, steps or garden art is a growing problem.

10) MONEY:

Money is a concern at cemeteries that have not been able to build endowments through bequests or donations. While some associations have been fortunate in this regard and are able to operate off of the interest from their investments, this is not the case everywhere. Many cemeteries, especially small rural cemeteries and those attached to a church, are continually strapped for cash. Efforts to raise money are minimal and usually cover only bare maintenance. There isn’t sufficient expertise or leadership to undertake any kind of major financial campaign. And rarely is a program in place to repair stones – and extremely rarely does it involve proper restoration. Cemeteries on private land, of course, usually have no funding whatsoever, unless they have been taken under the wing of an organization such as the Missisquoi Historical Society or the Barnston Heritage Cemeteries Association.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Based on the preceding, QAHN would like to make the following recommendations.

1) Ideally, a complete inventory of cemeteries across Quebec should be undertaken, including not just cemeteries currently at risk, but all cemeteries. This inventory should incorporate a grading system, along the lines of the one developed by QAHN. QAHN’s own Inventory gives an excellent indication of the scope of the problems facing cemeteries in the province, but a complete study is essential. Before any further steps are taken on a provincial level, we must know what we have. A similar recommendation was made by the Commission de la culture sur l’avenir du patrimoine religieux in 2006.

2) There needs to be a concerted effort among interested parties across Quebec to educate the general public (especially the younger generation) and cemetery custodians in particular about the place that cemeteries hold in our society – not merely as repositories of the dead, but as important heritage sites worthy of preservation. Local historical societies, heritage groups, heritage activists, and community organizations can all play a role in this process. Publications, a media campaign and educational programs can help foster greater awareness in our society of cemeteries and the problems they face. Municipal and provincial governments should play a leading role, since it is quite possible that many cemeteries will survive only through legislative protection and government funding.

3) The Government of Quebec should set up a fund for cemetery restoration and maintenance, preferably one that is completely independent of existing funding programs for churches and other religious heritage sites. The fund could be similar in nature to the one administered by the Conseil du patrimoine religieux du Québec. However, given the magnitude of the problem, the number of cemeteries privately owned or owned by an association or company with no religious affiliation, and the priority that has traditionally been placed on religious architecture (as opposed to cemeteries), a fund should be devoted strictly to cemeteries -- and to cemeteries of all types. A rating system could be developed to determine the heritage value of each cemetery.

4) The Government of Quebec should set up a program, with appropriate funding, for training specialists in the proper restoration and care of gravestones and cemeteries. Presently there are few people working in this field in Quebec. This could be organized through the Centre de conservation du Québec, or as part of a university degree or cegep program. A directory of specialists could then be created so that cemeteries in need would have somewhere to turn for help. A similar recommendation was made in 2006 by the Commission de la culture – at least in terms of training and technical support for proprietors of “religious heritage.”

5) The Government of Quebec should set up a program whereby students could get meaningful summer work experience as part of a “cemetery youth corps.” The mandate of this corps would be to help volunteer cemetery trustees or landowners conduct basic clean up operations (grass cutting, fence mending, brush cutting, etc.) at neglected cemeteries. The program would include training, followed by hands-on fieldwork. It could be administered by Emploi-Quebec, possibly as a pilot project in the Eastern Townships or some other region where many cemeteries can be found within a small geographic area. It could take place in partnership with heritage groups (such as QAHN) and local cemetery associations. The program would not only help cemetery associations that are struggling and contribute towards the preservation of our heritage, but it would also help spread awareness among youth about the importance of cemeteries as heritage sites. An added bonus would be that it would foster team spirit, leadership and organizational skills among participants, tools that would serve them throughout their lives.

6) The Government of Quebec should amend its cemeteries laws -- both Catholic and non-Catholic -- to reflect a greater respect for cemeteries as spiritual grounds and as final resting places (in every sense of the word) for those interred there. Laws need to protect from disinterment or desecration not only the bodies beneath the ground, but also the gravestones that mark these burials. Cemeteries as ensembles also need to be protected. Catholic cemetery law needs to be re-written so that cemetery companies are no longer free to do as they please with “abandoned” plots. Cemeteries situated on private property need to be protected, as well. Perhaps a province-wide moratorium on the destruction of cemeteries and gravestones should be considered. Laws, such as the Cemetery Companies Act, should be clarified, so that the rights and responsibilities of all concerned (i.e., caretakers, landowners and visitors) are understood by all and no longer the subject of speculation. Rights of access to cemeteries on private property should be enshrined for caretakers and visitors alike.

7) Municipalities should be encouraged to cite cemeteries of local historical significance as heritage sites. Citation at the municipal level offers heritage sites both protection and potentially funding at the municipal level. It also renders them eligible for funding from the Fonds du patrimoine culturel québécois, and places them in the Répertoire du patrimoine culturel du Québec. Municipal citation is a useful tool for safeguarding privately owned burial grounds from destruction by landowners.

8) Grave desecration -- of both bodies and gravestones -- should be recognized and punished as a crime in Canada. The Criminal Code should be amended to reflect this. All too often cemetery vandalism and theft are treated as pranks or as minor offences barely worthy of prosecution. The dead should be accorded the respect they deserve. And their final resting place should remain just that -- final.

9) Laws should be enacted forbidding the re-sale of old gravestones. Such legislation has already been passed in some jurisdictions in the United States (Massachusetts, for example), and serves as a deterrent to gravestones theft.

10) Custodians of established cemeteries should be encouraged to take on the management of nearby orphaned cemeteries, to at least ensure a basic level of upkeep, proper signage, and so on. Associated legal and administrative costs could be funded through the new provincial cemetery fund.

11) Cemetery custodians should be encouraged to reach out to a broader segment of the population. They need to expand their demographic base. For example, traditionally English cemetery associations should involve French-speaking volunteers interested in heritage; they should endeavor to make the cemetery a historic site for the area, not just for local English speakers.

12) Cemetery custodians need to think creatively in terms of fundraising. Fundraising and other cemetery activities need to be kept in the public eye through constant media publicity. The cemetery should be turned into a “cause” – and efforts should be aimed not just at a certain segment of the population but at everyone. Cemeteries can also be marketed as local tourist attractions, with guided tours offered for a fee. A tour of local cemeteries can even be published, the profits from sales going towards upkeep.

13) Heritage tourism, an ever-growing sector of the overall tourism industry in Quebec, should better reflect the importance of cemeteries as heritage sites. Cemeteries can be fascinating places to visit, tranquil enclaves within towns and villages, offering respite from the noise and traffic of the world around them, or pleasant stops along quiet country roads. They can be incorporated into tours of regional heritage sites or they can be the attractions themselves. In either case, cemeteries and the history they contain represent potentially important assets in the heritage tourism sector.

FINDINGS:

SUMMARY:

Researchers have examined 311 cemeteries to date -- a considerable sample by any definition. Out of that number, we have classified 130, or 41.8 %, as being at risk. Many of these may be considered severely at risk. A further 27 cemeteries, or 8.7 %, have disappeared altogether. When combined, these figures total over half of all the cemeteries considered for this study. This is alarming, to say the least. And these numbers will almost certainly rise if the trends we have observed continue.

FINDINGS (BY ADMINISTRATIVE REGION):

Region Evaluated At Risk Extinct
Estrie 191 77 26
Montérégie 81 32 1
Laurentides 33 16 0
Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean 4 4 0
Outaouais 2 1 0
TOTALS: 311 130 27
Estrie Evaluated: 191 At risk: 77 Extinct: 26 At Risk:
Region 0-10 Points 11-20 Points 21-30 Points 31-40 Points 41-49 Points Incomplete Data Extinct Total at Risk / Extinct
Estrie 10 10 717 13 20 26 103
Montérégie 2 3 48 6 9 1 13
Laurentides 1 1 34 7 0 0 16
Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean 0 0 01 1 2 0 4
Outaouais 0 0 01 0 0 0 1

FINDINGS ( CEMETERIES AT RISK):

TABLE ONE:

ITEM QC CODE Cemetery Name Municipality MRC Administrative Region County Record Created by
ESTRIE
1- QC1203 Thompson Ham-Sud Asbestos Estrie Wolfe Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
2- QC0548 Baldwin-Wheeler Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
3- QC0550 Barnston / Pleasantview Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
4- QC0579 Belknap Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
5- QC0000 Bellows Coaticook Coaticook Estrie -- Leslie Nutbrown
6- QC0000 Bickford Corner Coaticook CoaticookEstrie -- Leslie Nutbrown
7- QC0581 Blanchard Barnston Ouest Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
8- QC0000 Bowen Compton Coaticook Estrie -- Leslie Nutbrown
9- QC0048 Brown’s Hill Stanstead Est Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
10- QC0057 Carr Compton Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Russell Nichols; Leslie Nutbrown)
11- QC0592 Child Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
12- QC0593 Cleveland Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
13- QC0088 Doak Compton Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Russell Nichols; Leslie Nutbrown)
14- QC0089 Draper’s Corner Compton Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Russell Nichols; Leslie Nutbrown)
15- QC1022 Hereford Hill Road Saint-Herménégilde Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan
16- QC0150 Hyatt Burial Ground Waterville Coaticook Estrie Sherbooke Matthew Farfan (Sources: Milt & Bev Loomis)
17- QC0562 Kilburn Barnston Ouest Coaticook Estrie -- Leslie Nutbrown
18- QC0000 Kinney (Cooper) Coaticook Coaticook Estrie -- Leslie Nutbrown
19- QC0000 Lambkin Waterville Coaticook Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Russell Nichols)
20- QC0172 Libby (Libbey) Compton Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Russell Nichols; Leslie Nutbrown)
21- QC0610 Lovell Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
22- QC0615 Marsh Coaticook Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
23- QC1416 McIntosh (Bill) Waterville Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Russell Nichols; Milt & Bev Loomis; Leslie Nutbrown)
24- QC1021 Old Hereford Saint-Herménégilde Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Leslie Nutbrown; Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
25- QC1202 Perryboro Saint-Herménégilde Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association; Leslie Nutbrown)
26- QC0276 St. John Waterville Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Russell Nichols; Leslie Nutbrown)
27- QC0000 Ward Neighbourhood Coaticook Coaticook Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (SHS)
28- QC1427 Wyman Barnston Ouest Coaticook Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (SHS)
29- QC0000 Ball Family Frontenac Le Granit Estrie -- Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
30- QC1235 Boyle Family Frontenac Le Granit Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
31- QC1257 Braddock Family Frontenac Le Granit Estrie Frontenac : Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
32- QC1056 Brown Family Frontenac Le Granit Estrie Frontenac : Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
33- QC1234 Fletcher Family Frontenac Le Granit Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
34- QC1049 Gisla Milan Le Granit Estrie rontenac Matthew Farfan (Sources: Isabell MacArthur Beattie; Leslie Nutbrown)
35- QC1047 McAulay Nantes? Le Granit Estrie Frontenac Matthew Farfan (Sources: Isabell MacArthur Beattie; Leslie Nutbrown)
36- QC1210 McIver-Beaton Milan Le Granit Estrie Frontenac Matthew Farfan (Sources: Isabell MacArthur Beattie; Leslie Nutbrown)
37- QC1054 Presbyterian-Ditchfield Frontenac Le Granit Estrie Frontenac Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
38- QC1219 Bishop Dudswell Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Wolfe Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
39- QC1207 Marbleton United (Methodist) Dudswell Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Wolfe Matthew Farfan (Sources: Leslie Nutbrown; Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
40- QC1029 North Road Newport Township Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Source: Pat Boychuk)
41- QC1058 Old Burial Place Scotstown? Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
42- QC1037 Prescott Bury Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
43- QC1064 Rolfe-Harding’s Corner Dudswell Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Wolfe : Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett; Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association)
44- QC1031 Sawyer Brook Hill Cookshire-Eaton Le Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
45- QC0000 Bethel Maricourt Le Val-Saint-François Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Marilyn Davis)
46- QC0000 Brandt’s Hill /Peter Brandt Cleveland Township Le Val-Saint-François Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Richmond County Historical Society)
47- QC0125 Greenlay Windsor Le Val-Saint-François Estrie Sherbrooke Leslie Nutbrown
48- QC0000 Lawrence Melbourne Township Le Val-Saint-François Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Marilyn Davis)
49- QC1417 Mclean / Presbyterian / Town Line / Riverside Windsor Le Val-Saint-François Estrie Richmond Matthew Farfan (Source: Richmond County Historical Society)
50- QC0000 Wadleigh Richmond or Saint-Félix-de-Kingsey Le Val-Saint-François Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Esther Healy)
51- QC0580 Bissell Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan
52- QC0581 Blanchard Potton Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
53- QC0582 Bodwell Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan
54- QC0000 Bryant Austin Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Joan Cruickshank)
55- QC1348 Burbank Potton Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
56- QC0000 Channel / Channel Bay Austin Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Topographic map, Dept. of National Defence, Canada, 1936)
57- QC0060 Chapel Hill Potton Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association; Joan Cruickshank)
58- QC0000 Drummond Point Magog Memphremagog Estrie Brome Leslie Nutbrown; Matthew Farfan
59- QC1340 Elkins Potton Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
60- QC0123 Gilman (Airport Road) Potton Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
61- QC1353 Gilman (Sargent) Potton Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association; Joan Cruickshank
62- QC0000 Highwater Potton Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: G. Leduc)
63- QC0000 Hill Canton de Stanstead Memphremagog Estrie -- Leslie Nutbrown
64- QC0602 Hill Top (Pine Hill) Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan (Jim Wharry)
65- QC0000 Hopps Austin Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Kevin Pryce)
66- QC1345 Jones Potton Township Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Sources: Jones Cemetery Association/ PHA)
67- QC0000 Judd Point / Rexford Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie -- Leslie Nutbrown / Matthew Farfan (Sources: SHS / Leslie Nutbrown / Elaine Wilson)
68- QC1343 Leadville Potton Township Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: PHA)
69- QC0603 Magoon Poin Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown; Matthew Farfan
70- QC0616 Norton Sainte-Catherine-de-Hatley Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan (SHS)
71- QC0606 Oliver Corner Magog Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Leslie Nutbrown
72- QC1011 Orcutt Potton Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
73- QC1332 Potter Potton Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
74- QC1342 Province Hill Potton Township Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: PHA)
75- QC0000 Sacré-Coeur Stanstead (Town) Memphremagog Estrie -- Matthew Farfan
76- QC0251 Skinner Potton Memphremagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: Potton Heritage Association)
77- QC0623 Stickney Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead Nutbrown
78- QC1214 Butternut Grove Dudswell Haut-Saint-François Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
79- QC1059 Dutch Cemetery-Victoria Scotstown? Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Source: Isabell MacArthur Beattie)
80- QC0094 Early Eaton Cookshire-Eaton Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
81- QC0000 Irish / Catholic East Angus Haut-Saint-François Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Sources: Bev Loomis)
82- QC1345 Jones Burial Ground Waterville Coaticook Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan (Sources: Milt & Bev Loomis)
83- QC1041 Keith Lingwick Township Haut-Saint-François Estrie Compton Matthew Farfan (Source: Isabell MacArthur Beattie)
84- QC1202 Perryboro – Family 1 Saint-Herménégilde Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
85- QC1202 Perryboro – Family 2 Saint-Herménégilde Coaticook Estrie Stanstead Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
86- QC0000 Pioneer Coates Westbury Township Haut-Saint-François Estrie -- Matthew Farfan (Sources: Wells Coates & Keith Bennett)
87- QC0000 Stanstead County: 16 Miscellaneous Vanished Cemeteries :- Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
88- QC0000 Merrill / Wood (#5); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
89- QC0619 Old Stanstead Protestant (#24); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
90- QC0000 Bacon’s Bay (#33); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
91- QC0625 Turnertown (#26); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
92- QC0000 Kingscroft (#42); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
93- QC0000 Lyons / Perkins (#56); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
94- QC0000 Pinkham / Bachelder (#58); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
95- QC0000 Hill (#65); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
96- QC0000 Coaticook (#73); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
97- QC0567 Parker / Buckland (#79); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
98- QC0000 Ayer’s Flat (Tyler) (#84); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
99- QC0000 Minton (#87); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
100- QC0000 Thayer Farm (#90); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
101- QC0617 Lee Cemetery (#92); Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
102- QC0626 Worth; Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
103- QC0627 Wilcox Stanstead Township Memphremagog Estrie Stanstead --
104- QC1009 Union Magog Memphrmagog Estrie Brome Matthew Farfan
MONTÉRÉGIE
105- QC0028 Bates Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
106- QC0056 Capron Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
107- QC0059 Chandler Stanbridge East Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society); Matthew Farfan
108- QC0112 Fitchett Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
109- QC1394 Fuller Road West Bolton Brome Missisquoi Montérégie Brome John V. Fowles
110- QC0135 Harris Hillside Stanbridge East Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
111- QC0136 Harvey Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
112- QC1354 Hastings Saint-Armand Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Brome Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
113- QC0140 Hazard Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
114- QC0147 Hunter’s Mills / Lagrange Frelighsburg Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
115- QC1413 Jewell Farnham Township Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
116- QC0156 Johnson Saint-Armand East Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
117- QC0943 Luke Saint-Armand East Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
118- QC0000 Mandigo Corners (Brockville) Saint-Sebastien Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie -- Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
119- QC0000 Mudgett Sutton Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Marilyn Davis)
120- QC0000 Nigger Rock Saint-Armand Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Matthew Farfan
121- QC0221 Pike River Saint-Pierre-de-Veronne-à-Pike-River Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
122- QC0231 Riceburg Stanbridge East Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
123- QC0248 Selby Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
124- QC0000 Sornberger Saint-Armand Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
125- QC0297 Stone Saint-Ignace-de-Stanbridge Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
126- QC0304 Ten Eyck Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
127- QC0311 Vail Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
128- QC0312 Vaughan Bedford Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
129- QC1369 Wells ? Farnham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Brome Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
130- QC0318 Westover Dunham Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Brome Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
131- QC0322 Wing Dunham Township Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Brome Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
132- QC0129 Hayes Bromont La Haute-Yamaska Montérégie Shefford Matthew Farfan (Source: Marilyn Davis)
133- QC0000 Williams Shefford Township La Haute-Yamaska Montérégie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Marilyn Davis)
134- QC0138 Hawley / South Beech /Aird Clarenceville Le Haut-Richelieu Montérégie Mississquoi Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
135- QC0000 St. George’s Anglican / Clarenceville Clarenceville Le Haut-Richelieu Montérégie -- Heather Darch; Judy Antle (Missisquoi Historical Society)
136- QC0000 Sir John Johnson Burial Site Mont-Saint-Grégoire Le Haut-Richelieu Montérégie -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Adelaide Lanktree; Townships Heritage WebMagazine)
137- QC1010 Gilman Corner Lac-Brome Brome-Missisquoi Montérégie Brome Matthew Farfan (Source: Marilyn Davis)
LAURENTIDES
138- QC0347 Christ Church Anglican Saint-André-d’Argenteuil (St. Andrews East) Argenteuil Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
139- QC1410 Edina Brownsburg Argenteuil Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
140- QC0000 Old Shrewsbury-in-the-Bush Gore Argenteuil Laurentides -- Sandra Stock
141- QC0484 Pointe-aux-Chênes Protestant Grenville-sur-la-Rouge Argenteuil Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock (Source: Edith MacCallum)
142- QC0352 St. John’s Anglican, Shrewsbury Gore Argenteuil Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
143- QC0283 St. Mungo’s United Church Brownsburg (Cushing) Argenteuil Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
144- QC0245 Scotch Road Grenville-sur-la-Rouge Argenteuil Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
145- QC1014 New Glasgow Anglican Sainte-Sophie (New Glasgow) La Rivière-du-Nord Laurentides Terrebonne Sandra Stock
146- QC1014 New Glasgow Community Sainte-Sophie (New Glasgow) La Rivière-du-Nord Laurentides Terrebonne Sandra Stock
147- QC0000 Saint Columban Roman Catholic, Irish Section Saint-Columban La Rivière-du-Nord Laurentides -- Sandra Stock
148- QC0000 St. John the Baptist in the Wilderness Anglican Saint-Hippolyte (Kilkenny) La Rivière-du-Nord Laurentides -- Sandra Stock
149- QC0000 Shawbridge United Church Prévost La Rivière-du-Nord Laurentides -- Sandra Stock
150- QC1015 Grace Church Anglican Arundel Les Laurentides Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
151- QC1016 Gray Valley Huberdeau Laurentides Laurentides Argenteuil Sandra Stock
152- QC0000 St. George’s Anglican Church Saint-Remi-d’Amherst (Rockway Valley) Laurentides Laurentides -- Sandra Stock
153- QC0000 Church of the Good Shepherd (Anglican) Wentworth Nord (Laurel) d’en-Haut Laurentides -- Sandra Stock
SAGUENAY-LAC-SAINT-JEAN
154- QC0000 Grande-Baie Protestant Cemetery Saguenay Le Fjord-du-Saguenay Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Peter Marshall)
155- QC0000 Kenogami Protestant Saguenay Le Fjord-du-Saguenay Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean -- Matthew Farfan (Sources: Stuart Shea; Peter Marshall)
156- QC0000 Mashteuiatsh Pointe-Bleue Protestant Cemetery Mashteuiatsh (Pointe-Bleue) Le Fjord-du-Saguenay Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Saguenayensia)
157- QC0000 Riviere-du-Moulin Protestant Cemetery Saguenay Le Fjord-du-Saguenay Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean -- Matthew Farfan (Source: Saguenayensia)
OUTAOUAIS
158- QC0000 Brookdale United Church Cemetery Boileau (Brookdale) Papineau Outaouais -- Sandra Stock
159- QC0000 -- -- -- -- -- --

TABLE TWO:

ITEM QC Code Address / Directions Brief history of Establishing Community, Religious Congregation or Family Legal Owner Custodian Governance Structure Contact Info (Contact person(s), mailing address, telephone number, email) Date of Earliest Burial Date of Most Recent Burial Cemetery Status (Active / Inactive) Cemetery Size (square metres) Number of Burials
ESTRIE
1- QC1203 5 km S. of Ham-Sud on W side of rd., a short distance along disaffected rd. The extinct community of Erle is a little to the south of here. Erle was once a thriving community with a school, church and a number of homes. Today there are almost no traces left. This graveyard must have served as a neighbourhood burial site. -- Lakeside Cemetery, Dudswell -- -- 1858 1913 Inactive Approx. 20 X 30 metres 38+
2- QC0548 From Barnston go toward Baldwin’s Mills on the Baldwin-Barnston Rd. The cemetery is on the right at the junction of Baldwin-Barnston and Tremblay Rds Family -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1814 1933 nactive Approx. 48m² 23+
3- QC0550 Take Baldwin-Barnston Road from Barnston. Turn right on Stanstead Rd. Keep right and at the corner look down in the field to see the cemetery. Community -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1814 1928 Inactive -- 43+
4- QC0579 Off Lyon Road in Baldwin’s Mills in the woods on a semi-private road. Family -- Belknap Family -- Jim Belknap 1834 1834 Inactive Abt 36m² 10+
5- QC0000 At junction of Route 141 and Madore Rd. near Barnston (in a grove of trees). Family -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1826 1922 Inactive Approx. 48m² 10+
6- QC0000 Take Baldwin-Barnston Road from Barnston. Turn right on Stanstead Rd. Keep right and at the corner look down in the field to see the cemetery. Community -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1814 1928 Inactive -- 43+
7- QC0581 From Ways Mills, take Isabelle Rd. to Provencher Rd. The cemetery is on Provencher Rd. on your left, very near a farm house. Family -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1832 1881 Inactive Approx. 16m² 6+
8- QC0000 Between Hatley and Compton (off Route 208) on Pouliot Rd. Family -- -- -- Ellie Bowen Bailey Dixville (819) 849-4582 1830 1916 Inactive Approx. 150m² 52+
9- QC0048 In Ayer’s Cliff take Rte 141 West. Turn left on Dustin Rd. Turn right on Brown’s Hill Rd (Colline Brown). Community Brown’s Hill Cemetery Corporation Weldon Dustin Incorporated association Brown’s Hill Cemetery Corporation (Leta Dustin secretary) 1803 1978 Inactive -- 183+
10- QC0057 From Compton, take Chemin Hatley) 3-4 km. The cemetery is on the right as you go up a little hill and it is surrounded by trees amidst farmland. According to Russell Nichols, this was once (c.1903) a Church of England burial ground. No deed; no distinct lot; formerly Carr Cem. Association Newly formed Compton County Pioneer Cemetery Association: occasional volunteer labour. Uninc. association Russell Nichols, (819) 835-9117 1839 1973 Inactive -- 125
11- QC0592 Behind house at 2515 Cabana Rd., Baldwin’s Mills (a 5 min walk from the house in a clearing in the woods) Family -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1873 1903 Inactive Approx. 25m² 6+
12- QC0593 From the town of Barnston take Rte 141 East toward Ayer's Cliff. Take the first left which is Madore Rd. Then take the first left on this road which is a cul de sac named Martineau Rd. The cemetery is opposite a farmhouse and near the road Family -- -- -- -- 1829 1901 Inactive -- 16+
13- QC0088 From Compton, take Chemin d'Hatley, Route 208, about 3 km; then Chemin Dion going S. Continue until you cross under a railway overpass and the cemetery is not far from here on your left. According to Leslie Nutbrown, the land for the cemetery was donated and dedicated for use as a cemetery by Abigail and Robert Doak, in memory of their son George W Doak, in 1829. Distinct lot Newly formed Compton County Pioneer Cemetery Association: occasional volunteer labour. Uninc. association Russell Nichols, (819) 835-9117 -- 1908 Inactive -- 20 but some of the stones were apparently removed to California in the early 1970s).
14- QC0089 From Compton, take Chemin Cookshire out of town. Continue on this road for a few km and watch for Viens Road on your right. Turn here and the cemetery is a short distance, possibly ½ km on your right. It is difficult to spot even though it is beside the road. This area was once known as Draper’s Corner. Private property None. Compton Historical Society has fixed this cemetery up a little. Occasional volunteer weed cutting. None Eddie Echenburg. Russell Nichols, (819) 835-9117. 1838 1860 Inactive Approx. 3 X 4 metres 3 (But some stones have been lost)
15- QC1022 Hereford Hill Road, N. of Hereford village Hereford is a small hamlet on the Vermont border -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
16- QC0150 From Milby, take McVety Rod until the Suitor Rd. crossroads; turn right. The cemetery is visible in the field near the first house on the right. This farm was originally the farm of Abraham Hyatt Jr. and Thankful Cartwright, both of whom have inscribed gravestones here. The Hyatts were an early Loyalist family, and there may be Loyalists buried here Private, a hockey player -- -- -- Early 1800s -- Inactive -- Up to 40. Only 2 inscribed stones and 2 fieldstone markers visible.
17- QC0562 From Barnston take 141 toward Ayer’s Cliff, then take Madore Road on your left. Turn on Wheeler Road. The cemetery is down in the middle of the field near this junction. Family -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Association (Jim Belknap) 1839 1890 Inactive -- 28+
18- QC0000 From Coaticook take route 206. Turn right on Ch. de la Bruère. Cemetery is on the left opposite the first farm. Community Distinct lot Compton County Pioneer Cemetery Association Unincorporated association Russell Nichols, (819) 835-9117 1866 1874 Inactive 24 X 24 metres 8+
19- QC0000 This cemetery is located on a knoll beside the Coaticook River approx. 1 km SE of Waterville. It is situated on private property about ¼ km from the road, but the only way to access it is via the railroad tracks from Waterville (about 1 km from Waterville TG, just after the fork in the tracks and opposite a large grey barn on the opposite side of the road). This small graveyard was probably a family burial ground, and seems to have been used around for two (poss. 3) generations. Private property: Ruel family, proprietors None None -- 1831 (poss. earlier, because 1 very old slate marker is illeg.) 1863 Inactive Approx. 4 X 5 metres 9 (2 stones missing)
20- QC0172 From Compton take Route 147 N. a few km. As you start to go down the hill, the cemetery is on the left. From Lennoxville, take Route 143 to Route 147 and continue past Milby. The cemetery will be on the right side of the hill near the top. Private family burial ground serving the Libby family, in an area once known as Libby Hill. Private property; no deed Newly formed Compton County Pioneer Cemetery Association: occasional volunteer labour. Volunteers (descendants) Mow the lawn 4-5 times per year. Uninc. association Russell Nichols (descendant) (819) 835-9117 1861 1902 Inactive Approx. 10 X 10 metres. 11 (all the names are inscribed on 1 monument)
21- QC0610 From the town of Barnston at the Junction of Rte. 147 and Chagnon Road, take Chagnon Rd. for 2 km. The cemetery is on your left. Family -- Barnston Heritage Cemetery Corporation Incorporated association Barnston Heritage Cemetery Corporation 1860 1899 Inactive -- 19+
22- QC0615 From Stanhope turn left on the Baldwin-Barnston Rd. The cemetery is here, not far from Rte. 147. Community -- -- -- Crooker Brook Cemetery Association 1857 1997 Semi-active -- 75+
23- QC1416 From Lennoxville, take Route 143 S. a few miles. Turn E. on to Nichol Road. The cemetery is located several miles on Nichol Road on the S. side of the road just after the crossroads leading to Waterville. Burial site of a number of local families of various denominations, including the Bill family. McIntosh refers to a local landowner, who was a Member of Parliament. The area is sometimes referred to as the McIntosh neighbourhood. A schoolhouse used to stand next door to the graveyard. Lot 300 or 301. The Town of Waterville apparently pays a man to mow the lawn a few times per year -- Town of Waterville 1820s 1905 Inactive -- 37
24- QC1021 Just NE of Hereford village. Take Owen Road toward East Hereford. Go a short distance until the pavement ends. Then take a right into the woods on an unimproved road. The cemetery is on your right across from a boarded up schoolhouse. Hereford is a small hamlet on the Vermont border. -- None None -- c.1850 c.1926 Inactive -- 35
25- QC1202 Perryboro neighbourhood. Range 9 near St. Hérménigilde, just after Huot Road in a grove of trees on a hill. Little remains of the former hamlet of Perryboro, in which this small cemetery was situated. A church an schoolhouse, among other buildings, are now vanished. Private property None None -- 1872 1879 Inactive Approx. 30 metres X 30 metres At least 4. **Only 1 broken stone visible.
26- QC0276 60 Compton Ouest, Waterville, behind the Anglican Church Church of England Churchyard Church of England Church of England Church of England / Cemetery committee -- -- -- Semi-active -- 119
27- QC0000 2.5 km N. of Stanhope, on side road to the East; about 1 km up this road. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Inactive -- --
28- QC1427 On the left side of the driveway of the old farmhouse at 768 Rte. 141. This small family burial ground is in the angle of the driveway and highway Family plot for the Wyman family. At least 3 graves, including two infants. Private property. -- -- -- 1866 1872 Inactive Approx. 4 X 5 metres At least 3 (2 stones
29- QC0000 18 km SE of Frontenac, S. of intersection of roads east of Spider Lake (Lac aux Araignées). Family plot once serving the Ball family, one of several early Scottish burial sites in this area Private property: Cliche family. None None -- 1891 1896 nactive -- 4
30- QC1235 North shore of Spider Lake (Lac aux Araignées), SE of Frontenac Family plot once serving the Boyle family, one of several early Scottish burial sites in this area. Private property: Cliche family None None -- 1897 1949 Inactive -- 11
31- QC1257 15 km SE of Frontenac, near intersection of roads east of Spider Lake (Lac aux Araignées). Family plot once serving the Braddock family, one of several early Scottish burial sites in this area. Private property: Cliche family None None -- 1888 1890 Inactive -- 2
32- QC1056 20 km SE of Frontenac Family plot once serving the Brown family, one of several early Scottish burial sites in this area. Private property: Cliche family. None None -- 1888 1926 Inactive -- 7
33- QC1234 16 km SE of Frontenac, S. of intersection of roads east of Spider Lake (Lac aux Araignées). Family plot once serving the Fletcher family, one of several early Scottish burial sites in this area. Private property: Cliche family. None None -- No dates No dates Inactive -- 1
34- QC1049 This cemetery is adjacent to Gisla Rd. about 5 km N. of Rte. 214, at junction E. of Milan. Gisla Rd. leads N. at the “Donald Morrison Legend” Historic Site. This small graveyard, located on what is now an isolated dirt road, was once the burial ground for a Gaelic community known as Gisla, named after a place on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland, where most of the original settlers in this region came from. The cemetery has been designated a historic site by the municipality. Famous folk hero, the “Megantic Outlaw” Donald Morrison, is buried here. Gisla Cemetery Association Gisla Cemetery Association Incorporated association (semi-active). Wayne Mouland, President (819) 657-4434 Isabell Beattie, Board member (819) 346-2858 1857 2003 Active -- 163 (but many other graves are unmarked)
35- QC1047 The cemetery is on Rte 161 about half way between Stornoway and Nantes. Watch for Sand Hill Cemetery on your left and the McAulay Cemetery is just past the Sand Hill Cemetery on the opposite side of the road. This small cemetery is another of the burial grounds of Scottish settlers, mainly from the Isle of Lewis, Scotland who once lived in Frontenac County. It was an old family plot of a branch of the McAulay family Private property -- -- -- c.1891 c.1900 Inactive -- 5+ (Isabell MacArthur Beattiereports there were 8 burials)
36- QC1210 This cemetery is located beside the old Milan Road (Route 214) about 3km NW of Milan on property originally owned by Alex McIver. It is about ½ km in the woods, on the E. side of an old road (now a footpath) leading south of MacArthur's Corner (leading off of the highway on the opposite side of the “Donald Morrison Legend” Historic Site). This small abandoned graveyard was once the burial ground of members of the Beaton and McDonald families. At the time it was opened, it was located alongside the main road from Milan to Stornoway. The cemetery for the most part has returned to nature with ten or twelve tombstones still visible among the trees. Private property: Wayne Mouland, proprietor None The Lewis Cemetery Association has erected a monument at the Gisla Cemetery with the names of many of the pioneers buried here None (Abandoned: the Lewis Cemetery Association has written this cemetery off) Wayne Mouland, (819) 657-4434 1877 1947 Inactive -- At least 21
37- QC1054 4 km S. of Frontenac -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Inactive -- --
38- QC1219 On a small knoll behind the Clérmont-Lessard family home in Bishopton. This was most likely a family burial ground within the historic village of Bishopton. A number of Bishops are buried here. Private property: Clérmont-Lessard family, proprietors None None -- 1835 1893 Inactive Approx. 10 X 15 metres 8
39- QC1207 In Marbleton village (Dudswell), across the street from the Anglican church and feet away from the larger Anglican Cemetery Marbleton, along with Bishopton and Lime Ridge, is now a part of Dudswell. Marbleton’s early economy was based on the extraction of marble in the local quarry. Much of this stone is visible to this day in the numerous local graveyards. United Church of Canada (?) -- -- -- 1839 1951 Inactive -- 47
40- QC1029 S. of Island Brook at junction of North Rd. -- -- Paroisse Sainte-Famille -- Thuribe Lessard, Priest (819) 875-3073 -- -- -- -- --
41- QC1058 2 km South of Scotstown along Rte 257. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Inactive (poss. extinct) -- --
42- QC1037 Off Tambs Rd North, turn east on Prescott Rd; continue ¼ km until the gate and continue on foot up the gravel cow path (an disaffected road); the cemetery is about ¼ km on the right on a small knoll. Probably a small family or neighbourhood plot. Private property: Darcy Harrison, proprietor None, but the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association has erected a monument None -- 1891 (prob. 1860) 1916 Inactive Approx. 20 X 20 metres At least 3 (prob. 5). Only 2 broken gravestones visible
43- QC1064 On a disaffected road running on the left side of the Breton Co. yard in Lime Ridge (Dudswell). The dirt rd continues at the rear left side of the parking lot. The hamlet of Harding’s Corner has completely disappeared. This cemetery is all that remains. -- The Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association has erected a granite memorial in the graveyard None -- 1833 1913 Inactive -- At least 14.
44- QC1031 On Rte 253 between Eaton Corner and Sawyerville -- -- -- -- -- 1836 1883 Inactive -- 14
45- QC0000 Nestled among trees and bush in a neighbiurhood once known as Bethel, at the intersection of Route 222 N., out of Valcourt, and Bethel Rd. Easy to miss, as there are no signs. Probably a former community plot serving the little hamlet of Bethel. Private property. -- -- -- 1840s (at least) 1890 Inactive -- 14
46- QC0000 In the woods between Richmond and Danville (about 4 km S. of Danville, near the town line between Shipton and Cleveland). Early burial ground for soldiers and labourers (mostly Catholic) who worked on building the Craig Road. The six-acre plot was given to the Catholic Church by Peter Brandt c.1820. A log building nearby was used as a church by the Catholics (and apparently Anglicans, as well) until it was burned in 1838. Soon after, the old Catholic Church was built in Richmond village. The graveyard may have contained Protestant burials, as well. It may also have been used by the local community. Private property, originally Catholic Church burial ground -- -- -- 1826 -- Inactive (aban.) 6 acres Approx. 40 22 field-stone markers)
47- QC0125 At Windsor, cross the bridge toward Rte 55 Turn left (Greenlay South St.) Cemetery is on the right behind a bar up on a hill. Community -- -- -- -- 1827 1963 Inactive -- 158+
48- QC0000 From Richmond, take Route 243 S. to Melbourne Ridge. Cemetery is located about 3 km S. of Melbourne Ridge, on Route 243. Family plot once serving the Lawrence family. Private property -- -- -- 1849 1966 Inactive -- 19
49- QC1417 Near Windsor (S. side of Rte. 143, between the St. Francis River and the CN Railway tracks, on town line between Windsor and Cleveland). Mostly early Scottish pioneers. Originally affiliated with the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church (Lower Windsor, 11 km from Richmond) and Chalmers Presbyterian Church of Richmond. The deed to cemetery on Lot #1, Range #15 was purchased in 1885 by Francis McKenzie for $15.00. Property was apparently enclaved. Albert Lalonde (owner of access in 1993) -- -- -- 1841 1931 Inactive (possibly extinct, according to a 1993 report) ½ acre 25-30
50- QC0000 Between Richmond and Saint-Félix-de-Kingsey -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Inactive -- --
51- QC0581 Rte 247 N. towards the covered bridge. Before descending the hill to the bridge, turn on to Bissell Rd. Continue on this road for a few km. This tiny plot is on the N. side of the road, immediately adjacent to the road and opposite a wine producer. Burying ground of the Bissells Private property Family care None -- 1843 1896 Inactive Approx. 3.5 X 5 metres 4
52- QC0581 Located immediately across Rte. 243 from Muguet Rd., on a small knoll behind the pine plantation. Blanchard family burial ground. The Blanchards were among Potton’s earliest settlers Private property None None -- At least 1830s -- Inactive Approx. 5 X 5 metres 9 stones visible
53- QC0582 Rte 247 N. towards the covered bridge. Before descending the hill to the bridge, turn on to Bissell Rd. The graveyard is in a field on the north side of Bissell Rd. This early burying ground was once the family plot of the Bodwells, a prominent local family. Private property None None -- At least 1820s 1860s or later Inactive -- Approx. 15-20, poss. more
54- QC0000 Eastern Townships Autoroute W. to the St.-Benoit-Du-Lac exit (Exit 115); then follow Rte. 112 E. towards Magog; at the intersection of Rte, 112 and Chemin des Pères. Follow Chemin des Pères until it becomes Chemin Nicholas Austin at the Austin town line; from the Austin town line, watch for Shuttleworth Rd to the right. The cemetery is in a wooded area in a field along this road. Family burial ground of the Bryants and related families. Private property (the farm once belonged to Christopher Bryant). Restored from the bush and maintained (minimally)by current members of the Bryant family None -- 1855 1916 Inactive -- 24
55- QC1348 Located in a lovely clearing on the border of Potton and Bolton Est, on the E. side of Sugar Loaf Rd. Unknown. Named after Col. William Burbank who is buried here with Emily Fuller, who was presumably his wife. A second stone bears the name of Frank Dobson. Private property. -- -- -- c.1880s c.1880s Inactive -- 3 (2 stones)
56- QC0000 In Channel Bay, on the west shore of Lake Memphremagog, now part of the municipality of Austin. Probably a pioneer-era family plot. Private property. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
57- QC0060 Located on E. side of Miltimore Rd., 1 km N. of ch. Mansonville. Situated in an area once known as Meig’s Corner, one of Potton’s earliest communities, and located across the road from the site of the former Baptist Church. this cemetery was possibly originally a Baptist burial ground, but later became a general neighbourhood cemetery. Manson-ville Cemetery Company Manson-ville Cemetery Company Incorporated association -- 1820s Current Active -- 175+
58- QC0000 From Magog take Rte. 247 towards Georgeville. After several km watch for Drummond Point Rd. on your right. Turn here and then take Peasley Rd. Look for a stone covered with a box on your right. Family / Single gravesite. Local tradition states that Francis Peasley, buried here, and whose family lived some ways away, died of smallpox. -- Maintained by local cottagers -- -- 1802 1802 nactive -- 1
59- QC1340 Located just N. of the Colgan Rd., in a field. Colgan Rd. is reached via Rodrique Rd. S. of Highwater. Moses Elkins Jr. family burial ground Private property Landowner None -- 1869 1888 Inactive Approx. 2 X 2 metres 3
60- QC0123 On a farm off Airport Road, Potton. Buswell Gilman family. Private property -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3 (2 stones lying face up in a field)
61- QC1353 Located on heavily overgrown knoll on W. side of Vallee Missisquoi Rd, just E. of Happy Valley Campground, 1 km from ch. Mansonville junction. Named after Dr. William Gilman, and his father, Thomas Gilman, who came to the area in 1800, this cemetery was also known as the Sargent Cemetery, or the Campground Cemetery. The cemetery was abandoned many years ago, and the remaining headstones are scattered amongst the heavy underbrush, with many of them broken or toppled over. The Gilmans who were once buried here were removed some years ago to the Protestant cemetery in Mansonville. -- None None -- 1819 1931 Inactive -- 49+ (the Gilman stones were apparently moved). Only 10 or 12 stones visible
62- QC0000 In the woods in Highwater -- Private property. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
63- QC0000 From Georgeville take Rte. 247 S. Turn left on Ch de l’est. Cemetery is behind the old restored Richard Copp place on your left. Family -- -- -- -- 1841 1974 Inactive -- 10+
64- QC0602 In Fitch Bay (Stanstead Township), take Taplan Rd, then Bosquets Fleuris Rd., and the cemetery is in the trees behind a house at 80 Bosquets Fleuris Rd. Old village burying ground overlooking Fitch Bay. Lapsed cemetery association. Brookside Cemetery Association hopes to restore this cemetery. Part of Lot 457. Distinct lot on village cadastral map. None None -- 1811 1862 Inactive -- At least 17 (At least 2 gravestones are stored elsewhere)
65- QC0000 From Rte 112, at Lake Orford, take North Rd. S. for ½ km. This small family graveyard is located behind the white house at 554 North Rd. According to Kevin Pryce, a descendant, this was the Hopps family burying ground. The house was the Hopps homestead. Francis “Daddy” Hopps, a celebrated bear hunter, was the patriarch of the family. His son, Joseph Hopps, married Ida Powers, who was born at Little Brompton Lake Indian Village, and whose father was Abenaki and her mother white. Private property. None None Kevin Pryce 5799 Frenette, Ancien Rock Forest, Sherbrooke, QC J1N 2N2 (819) 791-0879 1870 (earliest visible date) 1901 Inactive -- 8-10 Only 3 visible stones have inscriptions
66- QC1345 In a farm field on the E. side of Chemin du Lac., in Perkins Landing, on the W. shore of Lake Memphremagog. Neighbourhood burial ground for the hamlet of Perkins Landing. The cemetery is named after the Jones family, whose farm surrounds it. Jones Cemetery Association Jones Cemetery Association (volunteers; work bees) Association Jones Cemetery Association 355 Chemin Vale Perkins Mansonville, QC J0E 1X0 Pearl Jewett, Pres.: (450) 292-5693 Maurice Jewett, Treas. (450) 292-5689 Bernice Magoon, Sect.: (450) 292-3860 1845 1959 Inactive -- --
67- QC0000 1.5 km S. of Oliver Corner, on hill on W. side of Rte 247. Look for property #3406 on the right. The cemetery is among trees in the field. Judd Point and Lake Memphremagog are to the W. This property was at different times the property of the Ives and the Rexford families. This small burying ground seems to have been a family plot for members of the Judd family, after whom nearby Judd Point on Lake Memphremagog is named. Three women are buried here. Private property: Derek Price family None None -- 1807 1828 Inactive -- 3
68- QC1343 Neighbourhood burial ground for the hamlet of Leadville, on the W. shore of Lake Memphremagog. Leadville is named after a lead mine that was once active near here. Distinct lot. -- -- -- Mid-1800s 1999 Semi-active -- --
69- QC0603 From Georgeville take Magoon Point Road to the end. Turn left onto Camber Road, and continue to Jones Road on your right. Stay on Jones Road for 2.2 km. You will see a wooden gate on your left blocking an old (now private) road. The cemetery is ¼ km down the private road, among a grove of trees on the right side of the road, at the edge of the field. Magoon Point, overlooking Lake Memphremagog, was a thriving community in the 19th century. The community had a post office, school, and was known for its lime production. There were at least two lime kilns operating in the area, both on the lakeshore. One of the kilns is still visible at the bottom of this old road, in a bay on Lake Memphremagog. This graveyard would have served people living in the immediate vicinity, most of them members of the Magoon family. Today the area is the property of a few wealthy landowners. Private property: Worthen family. None None -- 1833 1927 Inactive -- At least 20 (there are many uninscribed stones)
70- QC0616 N. of Ayer’s Cliff Rd., at theJct. Of ywo dirt road; 1 km SW of the MConnell Cemetery. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Inactive (poss. extinct) -- --
71- QC0606 From Magog take Rte. 247 towards Georgeville. Watch on the left for property #2460. The cemetery is here. Community -- -- -- -- 1813 1917 Inactive -- 64+
72- QC1011 Located on a prominent knoll on E. side of ch. Mansonville, 1.5 km SW of Mansonville. Early pioneer family burial ground, situated on land once owned by pioneer Lemuel Orcutt and his wife Freelove (Gilman) Orcutt (died 1833). Private property. None None -- At least 1833 -- Inactive Approx. 10 X 10 metres. 12+
73- QC1332 On a hill in the woods at the corner of West Hill Road and Fullerton Pond Road. NW side of the junction. Potter family burial ground. Private property. -- -- -- 1876 1880 Inactive -- 2
74- QC1342 5 km S. of Mansonville; just above the covered bridge, not far from the U.S. border Neighbourhood burial ground for the hamlet of Province Hill, named after its location on the “Province Line” or Canada-U.S. border. -- Mansonville Cemetery Company Incorporated association -- Mid-1800s -- Inactive -- --
75- QC0000 On Maple St. in Stanstead, just pas the post office and the ballpark. This was the first Roman Catholic cemetery in Stanstead. The earliest burials were of Irish Catholics. There were also many French-speaking people with anglicized names. Burials began in 1831, but the cemetery was only consecrated in 1848, when Sacré-Coeur Parish was established. A new cemetery was established in 1890, and many of the remains and gravestones were transferred in 1924 and 1937. Paroisse de Sacré-Coeur None (the church refuses to take care of this graveyard) Occasional volunteer work bees Stanstead Historical Society (819) 876-7322 1831 1907 Inactive -- 142+ (Some stones now in Sacré-Coeur Cemetery)
76- QC0251 Abandoned cemetery in a wooded area on N. side of Rodrigue Rd., after the junction with Colgan Rd. Skinner family burial ground Private property -- -- -- 1825 1857 Inactive -- 5
77- QC0623 Directly across from Camp Livingstone entrance on the Fitch Bay Road north of the village of Fitch Bay. Community -- -- -- -- 1854 1949 Inactive -- 28+
EXTINCT CEMETERIES, ESTRIE
78- QC1214 Formerly situated midway along the road from East Angus to Marbleton, this early graveyard was eliminated by the highway construction and the stones moved to Lakeside Cemetery in Dudswell. -- -- -- -- -- 1891 1904 Extinct -- At least 3 (prob. 8). 1 large Rolf gravestone moved to Westbury Cemetery.
79- QC1059 West of Scotstown, in woods. This cemetery served a small Dutch community that existed for a short time in this neighbourhood. Private property None None -- -- -- Inactive -- --
80- QC0094 No longer in existence (formerly SE of Birchton on the way to Eaton Corner) -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Extinct -- --
81- QC0000 East Angus. Early Catholic cemetery containing the graves of many Irish Catholics. In the 1920s or 1930s, the local Catholic parish began asking for permission from descendants to move the remains of those buried in this graveyard to a new Catholic cemetery. Some permissions were given. Others were not able to be reached. By the 1960s, there were still some graves / stones that had not been moved, and it was these that (apparently) were discarded. The Catholic parish sold the property to a local garage owner in the 1960s. -- -- -- -- -- Extinct -- --
82- QC1345 Nichol Rd, Waterville, on the former Jones (later) Nichol farm. Jones family plot. Private None None -- -- -- Extinct -- Poss. 24.
83- QC1041 5 km SW of Gould on Rte 108, on the E side of the road. Private property None None -- -- -- -- Inactive -- --
84- QC1202 On side road NW of Perryboro neighbourhood near Saint-Herménégilde village. Little remains of the former hamlet of Perryboro, in which this small cemetery was situated. This was a former family plot. Private property None None -- -- -- Extinct -- --
85- QC1202 On side road NW of Perryboro neighbourhood near Saint-Herménégilde village. Little remains of the former hamlet of Perryboro, in which this small cemetery was situated. This was a former family plot. Private property None None -- -- -- Extinct -- --
86- QC0000 SW of East Angus in field off side road. Small family or neighbourhood plot. Private property. None None -- -- c.1860s Extinct -- 2 children
87- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
88- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
89- QC0619 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
90- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
91- QC0625 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
92- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
93- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
94- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
95- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
96- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
97- QC0567 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
98- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
99- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
100- QC0000 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
101- QC0617 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
102- QC0626 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
103- QC0627 Exact locations available for these 16 vanished cemeteries at the Stanstead Historical Society (SHS). The numbers in brackets after each cemetery name refer to the numbers on the cemetery map at the SHS. Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
104- QC1009 Formerly located in downtown Magog by the old Union Church. Paved over in 1977. Attached to the old Union Church, this was Magog’s first cemetery. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
MONTÉRÉGIE
105- QC0028 Bullard Rd., Dunham Ebenezer Bates and his wife, Charlotte Brown were a Loyalist family who moved from New England (perhaps Massachusetts) in the period between 1794 and 1811. The Bates family are still living on the ancestral farm. Private property Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1817 1923 nactive -- 58
106- QC0056 Vail Rd., Dunham The graveyard was established by the Capron family in the early to mid-1800s Private property Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Little if any maintenance is performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1850 1910 Inactive -- 8
107- QC0059 In field on North Rd., Stanbridge East. The cemetery is located on the old Bullard Farm. The house on the corner of North and Bullard roads was built in 1843 by Joseph Chandler. At one time, large trees entangled the old gravestones, with woodchucks digging burrows in the roots. The MHS had all the stones mounted on a wall. Unknown (prob. private property) Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1824 1871 Inactive 20 X 80 80
108- QC0112 Between Dunham and Cowansville, just S. of Vail. Unknown, but probably an old family plot. Unknown – prob. Private property Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1885 1928 Inactive -- 15
109- QC1394 Near 74, Bolton Pass Rd. (route 243). 600 meters East (i.e. towards South Bolton) from the junction of Fuller Rd with Rte 243, just before the house at 74, Rte 243, is a wooded hill on the right. On the East end of this hill, about 150 meters in from Rte 243 is the cemetery. English names. Presumably the earliest people were pioneers, farmers of Loyalist stock. Possibly helped build Stagecoach Rd through the Bolton Pass. No obvious religious affiliation. The little church, St. Andrew’s in the Pass, opposite the cemetery on the other side of Rte 243, on Tuer Rd., was not yet built at the time the cemetery was active. Yves Allard, of Waterloo, Qc. He owns the cemetery, the land around it and the huge, active gravel pit behind it. The cemetery is part of Municipal Lot #P234. None None None 1831 1898 Inactive 1,000 sq meters At least 45 people, and at least 33 head stones.
110- QC0135 Gage Rd., Stanbridge East The Gage family, which is associated with this cemetery from early times, is one of the oldest families in our area. Nathaniel Gage was a traveling preacher in 1807 and Richard Gage was licensed to preach in 1812. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1838 2007 Semi-active -- 127
111- QC0136 Hudon Rd., East Dunham Established by the Harvey family in the early 1800s. Unknown Unknown Unknown -- 1804 1904 Semi-active (apparently more family members will be buried here) -- 111
112- QC1354 Located in a field on Ch. Saint-Henri in St. Armand. This graveyard consists of only one stone listing the father, mother and two of the children of the Hollis Hastings family. The graveyard is located on the lot that was owned by Hollis Hastings. Other members of the family are buried at Morgan’s Corner. Private property: P. Pelletier, Proprietor Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1829 1996 Inactive 10 X 10 4
113- QC0140 Russell Rd., Dunham The Hazard family of Dunham are descended from Thomas Hazard, born c.1610 in Britain who sailed from Wales to New England in 1635. Robert Hazard and his wife Mary Slokum came to Missisquoi County and bought land in East Dunham in 1804. This is their family burial ground. Private property Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Very basic maintenance is performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1836 1871 Inactive 12 X 12 8
114- QC0147 South side of Rte. 237, leading from Stanbridge East to Frelighsburg at the corner of the road leading south down into Hunter’s Mills. In 1790, Isaac Lagrange came from Albany, NY and purchased three lots. He built a house, saw mill, grist mill, etc. They were Hugenots, i.e., French Protestants. -- -- -- -- 1800 2000 Semi-active -- 95
115- QC1413 Farnham Rd., approx. 1.5 km from Mystic. Est. by the Society of Friends (Quakers) who came to Quebec seeking religious freedom, from Vermont, NY and New Hampshire, in the early to mid-1800s. In 1902, the property was deeded to Philip W. Taber, Curtis Taber and Charles H. Boright, in the will of Keziah Jewell. Private property Private Private Unknown 1826 1899 Inactive -- 22
116- QC0156 Chemin Spenser, off Chemin Pinnacle on the road to Abercorn -- Unknown Unknown Cemetery association (formed and registered in 1972 to repair and maintain the Johnson Cemetery). Unknown 1839 1940 Semi-active -- 38
117- QC0943 Ch. Saint-Armand. This very early cemetery is on the land where the Luke family first settled and is now owned by the Benoit family. Philip Luke and his family arrived in 1781 from Albany, NY. He was a 2nd Lieutenant in Butler’s Rangers. On May 6, 1835, he was appointed Captain of the Battalion of the Militia in the Circle of St. Johns. Private property: Benoit family, proprietors Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1796 1907 Inactive 10 X 10 17
118- QC0000 Rte. 227 in village of Saint-Sebastien. The Mandigo family came to Canada from Dutchess Co., New York in the late 1700s. William Mandigo and wife Catherine Fadden were the proprietors of the stage coach inn and general store at Mandigo’s Corners. Family Happenings in Miss Co., by Ruby Laduke Moore. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1824 1937 Inactive -- 167
119- QC0000 Mudgett Rd. (a dirt road) leads off Rte. 139, on the outskirts of Sutton village. The cemetery is situated close to the road. Very early neighbourhood burial ground, with several families represented. -- Maintained by local cottagers -- -- 1818 2002 Inactive (except for 2 recent Mudgett stones, poss. for ashes) -- 36
120- QC0000 Ch. Saint-Armand. On a clear day, “Nigger Rock” is visible to the south, across a farmer’s field, from this road between Saint-Armand and Philipsburg. Not far from the Luke Cemetery, on the same property. Oral tradition and increasing hard evidence suggest that there was once a substantial slave community in Saint-Armand. According to tradition, a large outcrop of rock near the village, known for generations as “Nigger Rock,” was a burial ground for slaves two centuries ago. The "Rock" is located on what was once the property of Philip Luke, a Loyalist, who settled in the area after the American Revolution, and who arrived with slaves. Oral tradition is strong among Saint-Armand's older residents, some of whom recall stories from their childhood about the old slave burial ground or about the blacks in the area. Private property: Benoit family, proprietors. None None -- -- -- Inactive -- No gravestones
121- QC0221 Located in a field close to the intersection of Rte. 133, In the Village of St.-Pierre-de-Veronne-à-Pike-River. Access is from Ch. des Rivières. The cemetery was originally a multi-denominational Protestant cemetery and was associated with the Methodist Church building which was erected in 1858. The building was sold in 1915 and no longer exists. Pike River Old Cemetery Company Pike River Old Cemetery Company Incorporated association Ross Howie; Erick Gasser 1828 1997 Active -- 211
122- QC0231 Riceburg Rd., Stanbridge East. Riceburg is a village on Pike River within the limits of the village of Stanbridge East. In 1809, Martin Rice & family emigrated from Leichester, MA to Canada – later settling in Riceburg. Various shops set up along the river as well as the famous Lambkin furniture factory. The Rice & Lambkin families are buried here.  Unknown Unknown Unknown Poss. Municipality of Stanbridge East. 1802 1998 Semi-active -- 98
123- QC0248 Located along Rte. 213 in Dunham on a section of land donated by the early Selby family, on the family farm. The family farm was first settled by a Jonathan Hart in 1794. Jonathan Selby, of England, purchased the land in 1822 with his wife and 8 children. Jonathan, his wife, and 1 son and his wife are the only ones buried in this small family plot. Private property Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1850 1906 Inactive -- 4
124- QC0000 Guthrie Rd., Saint-Armand. Family burial ground Private property. Unknown Unknown Unknown 1830 1998 Semi-active (family plot) -- 13
125- QC0297 In field near intersection of Galipeau Rd. and S. Church Rd., in Saint-Ignace-de-Stanbridge. The land was purchased on February 12, 1820 by Simon Stone Private property Unknown Unknown Unknown 1811 1940 Inactive -- 95
126- QC0304 Behind apple orchard on TenEyck Rd. Township of Dunham was erected in 1796, with both Andrew and Henry TenEyck each being one of the 34 Associates. The land where the cemetery is located is part of the 200 acres that were granted to the TenEyck family. Next to it is the TenEyck family farm. Private property: Yves Choinière Grandson of TenEyck family. None Yves Choinière 1194 Ten Eyck Rd., Dunham, QC J0E 1M0 (450) 295-3102 1827 1923 Inactive -- 20
127- QC0311 Vail Rd., which is located 3 km S. of Cowansville. -- -- -- -- -- 1826 (infant) 1987 Active -- 127
128- QC0312 Farnham Rd., approx. 1.5 km from Mystic. Clark R. Vaughan and his wife Elizabeth Corey bought land in this area in 1817. Mr. Vaughan commanded a company of militia during the years 1837-1838 and was a Justice of the Peace for more than 30 years. -- Mystic Cemetery Company Incorporated association -- 1818 1909 Inactive 40 X 50 61
129- QC1369 ?Farnham Glen. -- Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown -- -- Semi-active -- --
130- QC0318 Selby Lake Rd., Dunham This Canadian family is descended from John Jonah Westover and his wife Hannah Griswold. Westover immigrated to Connecticut from England in the mid-1600’s. Three of his grandsons (Loyalists) came to Canada in the late 1700s. The cemetery is part of John Westover’s (b.1789) farm. Private property: Duguay family, proprietors Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1854 1887 Inactive 15 X 15 7
131- QC0322 Hudon Rd., Dunham. Wing family came to Canada from Connecticut and Vermont seeking religious and political freedom. This is their family burying ground. Private property Missisquoi Historical Society Cemetery Committee Basic maintenance performed by MHS, which has taken this cemetery under its wing. Missisquoi Historical Society, 2 River St., Stanbridge East, QC J0J 2H0 (450) 248-3153. 1820 1865 Inactive 16 X 16 8
132- QC0129 From Autoroute 10 from Montreal, take exit 78; turn right onto Boul. Bromont; then left on Boul. Shefford towards Waterloo. The cemetery is by the highway. Family plot once serving the Hayes family. Private property. -- -- -- 1801 1913 Inactive -- 16
133- QC0000 From Waterloo, take Rte 112 E, toward Sherbrooke. Turn right at Frost Village. The cemetery is on Brill Rd. just outside of Frost Village. Family plot once serving the Williams family. Private property. Williams family (?) -- -- 1838 1991 Semi-active -- 19
134- QC0138 Located SW of Clarenceville on South Beech Rd., just off Rte. 202. Plot of farmland at this location was first used for the final resting place of Peter Hawley, who died in 1800. Cemetery became disused and unkept. In 1981, work began to clear it up. Low maintenance being done at the present time. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1800 1974 Inactive -- 340+
135- QC0000 Rte. 202, W. of Noyan. The building of the Anglican Church was started in 1818 and finished in 1820. Extensive renovations were done in 1864.  The infamous Rev. Micajah Townsend was ordained as priest in 1816 and inducted in 1829. Micajah, and his two wives and parents, are buried in this cemetery. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1798 1876 Inactive 16 X 16 313+
136- QC0000 On the side of Mont-Saint-Grégoire, in the Verger Monnoir apple orchard on the property of Centre d'interprétation du milieu écologique du Haut-Richelieu This site on the flank of Mount Johnson (present-day Mont St-Gregoire) contained the burial vault of famous Loyalist Sir John Johnson and his family. Johnson, who died in 1830, was the former Superintendent General of Indian Affairs and the 2nd Baronet of New York. Private property. Proprietor:C.I.M.E. (Transfer of title and access to the Société de restauration du patrimoine Sir John Johnson is in progress) Transfer of the title and access to the Société de restauration du patrimoine Sir John Johnson is in progress Transfer of the title and access to the Société de restauration du patrimoine Sir John Johnson is in progress. Adelaide Lanktree, Sir John Johnson Branch, U.E.L. of Canada (450) 293-6342 Nicole Poulin, Société d’histoire de la Haut-Richelieu (450) 358-5220 1812 1841 Inactive / Despoiled -- 7
137- QC1010 Gilman Corner is found on the cross section of Highway 104 and 139 in West Brome This very early neighbourhood cemetery was once situated at Gilman Corner, where the Papillon Restaurant now stands. It was removed to Pettes Cemetery in Knowlton on Sep 23, 1959, because Comet Construction wanted to make an asphalt plant and gravel pit there. The stones were put into one large monument in Pettes Cemetery. It is not known if any bodies are still in the original burial ground. Private property None None -- 1819 1877 Extinct -- At least 30
LAURENTIDES
138- QC0347 Chemin de Long-Sault, corner of Prince Edward, St. Andrews East Built in 1819, land donated by Sir John Johnson, Seigneur of Argenteuil. Declared historic monument by Quebec in 1985. Famous people buried here-Abbotts, Johnsons, Forbes, etc Anglican Diocese of Montreal Stanley Zack (450) 537-3549 Christ Church Corporation, but building now operated by separate group from the community Rev. Garth Morrill 3320 ch. Ile aux Chats, St.André-d’Argenteuil QC J0V 1X0 (450) 562-5478 1818 inside the church & 1825 cemetery. 1946 with exception made for Maude Abbott in 1990’s. Inactive Approx. 1.5 acres 200 plus many missing stones.
139- QC1410 Take ch. Edina off Route 327 North. Between Dalesville and Pine Hill. Cemetery completely invisible from road, up dirt lane. Originally Scots Presbyterian settlers, many born in Scotland, many born in 1700s. Very early pioneer community now vanished. Ruins of former farms in bush. Isolated location now. Unknown- but is recognized as a semi-protected site by the local MRC No interest in it from United Church of Canada. None: volunteer and informal; costs of incorporation too high, plus not many interested volunteers. Margaret Vokey, 1162 Route du Nord Brownsburg, QC J8G 1E5 (450) 533-6118 1862 (earliest stone-but there were earlier ones) 2005 (exceptional; but none for 35 years before that). Semi-active About 1 acre 100+
140- QC0000 Trail off dirt road in Gore, then through dense woods. Extremely hard to find and has been kept a secret by local family for many years Very early settlement of Irish veterans of War of 1812-14, according to local contact person, Stephen Brown. When Anglican Church built at Shrewsbury in 1851, this site was closed. Now on a large private property; present owner doesn’t even know it’s there. Stephen Brown, Lachute (450) 533-5897 None Jim Kyle, 321 ch. Cambria Gore J0V 1K0 (450) 432-9055 1820? (could be a bit earlier). 1840? Inactive Quarter acre 27 (acc. to oral tradition)
141- QC0484 Take ch. Donald Campbell left towards the Ottawa River, from Route 148 west from Grenville. On hill overlooking river. Presbyterian Scots settlers. Most later moved away from Grenville up the Rouge River valley. Cemetery was in very poor condition until major restoration by volunteers about 6 years ago. These were mainly elderly descendants of those buried there. Unsure. Presume it would be United Church of Canada-no-one knows for sure. Michael Bennet, employee of the MacCallum dairy farm, cuts grass. Volunteers None Edith & Isabel MacCallum, 1571 ch. de la Riviere Rouge, Grenville-sur-la-Rouge, QC J0V 1B0 (819) 242-6024 1830 1950 Inactive Approx. ½ acre 14 from remaining stones, but probably 30 to 50 in all. Many missing stones.
142- QC0352 136 ch. Shrewsbury, Gore. Take ch. Shrewsbury off Route 329. The church is the only remaining building of the former hamlet of Shrewsbury, which was deserted by the 1940s. Church built in 1851. Shrewsbury one of the first Irish and Scots pioneer settlements in mountainous part of the district. Should be made a historic site. Of great heritage and genealogical interest. Anglican Diocese of Montreal Volunteers-mainly descendants of settlers No paid help. Looked after by Holy Trinity, Lakefield, Corporation Jim Kyle, 321 ch. Cambria Gore J0V 1K0 (450) 432-9055 1868 (could be older ones, stones missing) 2005 (only-family members, as not much room left) Semi-active About 1 ½ acres About 150
143- QC0283 In Cushing, on Route des Outaouais (Rte.148),. Presbyterian church, large and impressive, built in 1836 in old community of Cushing on Ottawa River. Originally very affluent important river transportation centre. Congregation now very small, building now unsafe, needs restoration. United Church of Canada Elaine Fuller, chairperson of volunteers from church Volunteer group: about 5 are active and / or donate towards upkeep Elaine Fuller 518 Rte. des Outaouais Brownsburg (Cushing) QC J8G 1Z2 (450) 562-2524 1800 (earliest recorded, 1845 earliest remaining stone; (pre-dates church) 1940s Except: minister’s wife in 1990s Inactive. No room left for burials. Very rocky under first foot of soil. Missing stones. About 1 acre 100+. No exact records
144- QC0245 Rte. 148 W from Lachute, at crossroads for Grenville/Hawksbury, go N (right) along Scotch Road, about three miles to cemetery. Hard to find; need a guide / map. Scotch Road was settled from 1802 by emigrants from the Isles of Mull and Lochaber in Scotland. The cemetery dates from at least 1818. Once had Presbyterian church at foot of hill. Church building moved to Kilmar in 1930’s, then to Val Carroll resort in 1980’s. Area deserted for at least 50 years. Scotch Road Cemetery Association. Still searching for actual deed. Scotch Road Assn. Volunteers;no paid helpers. Corporation Helen Kennedy P.O. Box 47 Hudson Heights, QC J0P 1J0 (450) 458-5086 Cecil McPhee 1455 Clementine Blvd Ottawa, ON K1H 8K4 (905) 731-0132 www.scotchroadcemetery.com 1818 (Archibald McPhee stone still there –an amazing survival. 1999. (A few burials started again after 50 years lapse). Semi-active but not much room for more burials - looks full Slightly under 1 acre. Could be 1 arpent, French measure. 100 to 150-many missing stones. Hard to tell. Some graves unmarked perhaps.
145- QC1014 Chemin L’Achigan sud, Sainte-Sophie. Original site of the first St. John’s Church built in 1840, taken down in 1956. Only cemetery remains. New building, formerly Methodist, was then acquired in “centreville” New Glasgow at great distance from cemetery Anglican Diocese of Montreal George Vacaresco, town employee, cuts grass Volunteers from St. John’s Church, New Glasgow Nelson & Barbara Couvrette, 463 Carroll Saint-Columban, QC J0R 1N0 (450) 432-1579 1850 2006 Active – but not really busy! 1 acre About 200
146- QC1014 Corner of Rte. 158 and rue Murray, New Glasgow Originally Scots Presbyterian, then United Church & general English speaking community. Now noone seems to have any interest – present jurisdiction unknown. Many interesting inscriptions United Church of Canada, but no knowledge of this site known when Montreal Presbytery was contacted. None. A few concerned people took up a collection to have the grass cut None Noone My information came from Nelson & Barbara Couverette who look after the New Glasgow Anglican cemetery (450) 432-1579 1850 (oldest remaining stone but burials probably from time of settlement in the 1820s-1830s. 2006 Not many newer burials Semi-active 2 acres 300 to 400 Many missing stones.
147- QC0000 342 rue d’Eglise, Saint-Columban. Cemetery across road from church Very early pioneer Irish settlement (1820s). Could be first organized Irish agricultural settlement in Canada. Church built in 1835 and until 1940’s was mainly an English-speaking congregation. Irish left for better education and jobs in Montreal and the West Roman Catholic Diocese of Saint-Jérôme Fabrique de l’Eglise de Saint-Columban Fabrique (church corporation-nothing separate for cemetery). Fergus Keyes 523 Charon, Montreal, QC H3K 2P4 (514) 949-2710 – res. (514) 935-3769 - work 1832 (first recorded, 1843 from remaining stones 2007 Active Probably 6 acres About 700
148- QC0000 978 rue de la Chapelle Saint-Hippolyte. Pioneer church, built 1842, mainly Irish settlement. Now only one summer picnic event. Pioneer descendants & second home people still have some interest in church and cemetery Anglican Diocese of Montreal Bert Ward Cemetery corporation with own account separate from church. Bert & Cynthia Ward, 396 ch. Lac Connolly Saint-Hippolyte QC J8A 1A1 (450) 563-2511 1887 (but could be earlier burials) 2007 Active (but not very) About 1 1/2 acres Probably about 250
149- QC0000 Shawbridge United Church 1264 Principale, Prévost (Shawbridge). Cemetery is across the road from the church, down a lane, completely hidden from view from street. Church built in the 1850s, cemetery considerably older. Shawbridge was one of earliest settlements on the North River, once more prosperous than now;-many heritage houses & important part in early tourism / ski history of the Laurentians. Pretty town with old houses United Church of Canada, Montreal Presbytery Vincent Thorburn, but he has been ill. Volunteer position. (450) 224-2638 Church corporation directly (no separate cemetery organization). Bob Graham 17-135th Ave. Saint-Hippolyte, QC. J8A 1A1 (450) 563-4625 Earliest record: Isaac Cleary, 1815. Earliest remaining stone: Allen Saunders, 1867 2007 Active but grounds are very full. They find burials all over when digging-for missing stones. 1/2 to 3/4 acre. Prob. 300
150- QC1015 7 ch. Church, Arundel Historic pioneer-era church, built in 1879 Anglican Diocese of Montreal 4 church wardens see to cutting of grass No separate governance from Grace Church Corporation Bevan Boyd 11 ch. Lac Bevan Arundel, QC J0T 1A0 (819) 687-3798 Myra Nixon Loughren, 1883 1945 Inactive 3/4 acre Probably 100
151- QC1016 189 chemin Gray Valley Huberdeau Cemetery for local small agricultural community in Gray Valley. There once was a Hornerite Church near the site but it has been gone for about 80 years. Uncertain but land appears to belong to a loose corporation of local families. Lesley Staniforth - now very elderly and suffering from serious health problems. Volunteer- and very uncertain Beverley Gray 179 ch. Gray Valley Huberdeau (819) 687-9526. I found this person by looking in phone book - none of my contacts knew who looked after this site. 1908 (Robert Gray). There could be earlier missing stones. 1968 Inactive 3/4 acre Possibly 50 at the most
152- QC0000 1478 ch. Rockway Valley, Saint-Remi-d’Amherst. Cross Rouge River at Huberdeau, follow ch. Rockway Valley. Church built in 1912, cemetery probably older. English-speaking settlers from Arundel, Morin Heights, etc moved into Rockway Valley in 1880s-1890s. No real congregation at church now; a few second-home people support it in summer. Cemetery now shared with Plymouth Brethren group Anglican Diocese of Montreal Bob Sinclair (514) 636-0343 Looked after by Arundel Anglican church corporation Bob Sinclair (514) 636-0343 (819) 687-3486 weekends and summer, 122 ch.Sinclair Saint-Remi-d’Amherst Near church but only part-time residents 1907 (oldest stone, but there were earlier burials 2003 Active (not very) Half an acre About 150 but many stones missing
153- QC0000 3957 chemin de la Rivière Perdu (Lost River Road) Wentwoth Nord. Behind the church. Small Anglican church, built in 1890’s for Irish & Scots pioneer community, later for second home people too, occasional summer only services now. Anglican Diocese of Montreal Jeanie Ferguson Boutin/td> A few volunteers – nothing organized Jeanie Boutin 10 Grand Orme Morin Heights, QC J0R 1H0 (450) 226-2920 1897 2003 Semi-active 1/4 acre Only 12 remaining stones – est. about 30 burials total
SAGUENAY-LAC-SAINT-JEAN
154- QC0000 Alexis Tremblay Street, Grande-Baie sector of the former city of La Baie, now part of the City of Saguenay This small cemetery contains the graves of some of the town’s English-speaking founders. -- La Baie Catholic Cemetery Cemetery Association -- Late 1800s -- Inactive -- Approx. 12
155- QC0000 Montford Street in the village of Kenogami. Price Brothers (via the Kenogami Land Company) set aside land for a cemetery for their employees c.1918-20. In c.1945, Price Bros. enlarged the original cemetery. Most of the people buried in this Protestant cemetery were Anglicans. Even though it is fairly recent in age, this is the oldest cemetery in the region. Kenogami Protestant Cemetery Association Kenogami Protestant Cemetery Association Association (semi-dormant); in reality there are 2 or 3 volunteers and no real structure. Stuart Shea, Treasurer 3618, rue Racine, Jonquière, QC (418) 547-1064 c.1918 2007 Active Approx. 45 X 90 metres. Approx. 200
156- QC0000 Rue Atshikash, Pointe-Bleu (Mashteuiatsh) Indian Reservation, Lac Pekuakami. Pointe-Bleu (Mashteuiatsh) Montagnais Indian Reservation, with a small Protestant community, mainly Presbyterians and some Anglicans. A church and cemetery were consecrated in 1893. The church was demolished in 1960. -- -- -- -- c.1890s -- -- -- Approx. 80
157- QC0000 Riviere-du-Moulin, on the Saguenay River. Riviere-du-Moulin’s origins, dating back to the mid-1800s, were tied to the lumber industry. -- -- -- -- Mid-1800s -- Extinct -- --
OUTAOUAIS
158- QC0000 Ch. Brookdale, Boileau. Northwest of Huberdeau, dirt roads, although old settlement-still semi-agricultural, thin population but high percentage of English speaking residents. Historically and socially connected to Arundel (and the Laurentian region). Remote end of the Scots-Irish settlement. Small church originally Methodist, built in 1905, very attractive heritage site. Recent restoration work by volunteers to interior of church. Only used a few times in summer and at Christmas – no electricity, no heat. Just like it was in 1905. Needed local guide to find way around. United Church of Canada – no official deeds; some uncertainty about legal situation. Minimal interest from United Church Greta MacWhirter 2 elderly volunteer ladies – Mrs. MacWhirter and her sister. Greta MacWhirter 1125 ch. Maskingonge Boileau, QC J0V 1N0 (819) 687-2752 1906 2007 Active ¼ to ½ 1/4 to 1/2 acre. On a steep slope beside church. About 50.
159- QC0000 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

TABLE THREE:

ITEM QC Code Condition of Grounds (25 Pts) Condition of Gravestones (25 Pts)
General appearance (0-5 Pts) Gates / Fences (0-5 Pts) Lawns, shrubs, trees, support buildings (0-5 Pts) Access (0-5 Pts) Sign (0-5 Pts) Overall condition (0-5 Pts) Legibility of inscriptions (0-10 Pts) Effected repairs have employed proper conservation techniques (0-10 Pts)
ESTRIE
1- QC12031- 2311 (adjacent to an abandoned dirt road)212 0
2- QC05483300353 30
3- QC0550310013 70
4- QC0579300003 55
5- QC00002410351 50
6- QC0000310013 70
7- QC0581342133 70
8- QC0000343443 50
9- QC0048333543 66
10- QC0057343433 75
11- QC0592352023 30
12- QC0593100103 60 (Stones have been cemented into a tiny slab; cemetery size vastly reduced)
13- QC0088232422 40
14- QC0089221301 20
15- QC1022------------ ----
16- QC0150333 (Mowed)003 60
17- QC0562322003 44
18- QC0000100000 40
19- QC0000110002.5 (good shape; 2 damaged, fallen over; 2 missing) 40
20- QC0172332335 80
21- QC061034203.53 70
22- QC0615332303 60
23- QC1416344554 70
24- QC1021343504 50
25- QC12020001 (adjacent to road)00 20
26- QC027633353 (Sign for church)2 (At least ½ the gravestones are broken,) 7 (Some are difficult to read)0
27- QC0000------------ ----
28- QC14271.52.5 (Split rail fence & gate)1 (Overgrown trees, but graves seem to be at the centre of a kind of flower garden)302 4.50
29- QC0000------------ ----
30- QC1235------------ ----
31- QC1257------------ ----
32- QC1056------------ ----
33- QC1234------------ ----
34- QC104943 (Steel gate and fence along road only)4453 (10-12 broken stones; others need repointing) 70
35- QC10472012 (adjacent to Rte 161)02 50
36- QC121000 (Gate has long since disappeared)0003 (1 broken; 1 with part of monument detached) 50
37- QC1054------------ ----
38- QC1219333005 100
39- QC1207343503 70
40- QC1029------------ ----
41- QC1058------------ ----
42- QC10370101 (adjacent to an abandoned road)00 10
43- QC10642503 (adjacent to a disused rd)50 00
44- QC1031332550 00
45- QC0000303401.5 30
46- QC0000--(a very old stone wall surrounds cemetery)-------- No inscriptions (fieldstones, except one that has inscription “T.K.O.”)--
47- QC012533.53202 50
48- QC000043.53403 60
49- QC1417------------ ----
50- QC0000------------ No inscriptions (just fieldstones)--
51- QC058044353 (small wooden sign)4.5 100
52- QC05811.50 (But site has been de-lineated with metal stakes)0 (Small knoll is slightly overgrown)004 75
53- QC058202 Ancient stone walls and gateway, cobbled paths0000.5 1.50
54- QC000012 (Split rail fence)1 (Overgrown with trees and long grass)101 (Many broken stones, encased in wood on ground) 30
55- QC1348------------ ----
56- QC0000------------ ----
57- QC00603.55 (New Frost fence)4502.5 (Many of the older stones are broken, leaning or partially missing) 70
58- QC0000000001 8
59- QC1340300102.5 70
60- QC0123------------ ----
61- QC1353000100.5 2.50
62- QC0000------------ ----
63- QC0000000001 30
64- QC0602100002 50
65- QC000000 (Remnants of a fence are visible)0 (Site has been cleared of trees and brush)000 10
66- QC13453333 (Distinct lot, surrounded by private land; right of way) 03 60
67- QC0000000000 60
68- QC134333.53.5501.5 60
69- QC0603000000.5 20
70- QC0616------------ ----
71- QC0606332103 60
72- QC1011000000 20
73- QC1332------------ ----
74- QC1342333502 70
75- QC0000232.5 (Heavily wooded)551.5 30
76- QC0251------------ ----
77- QC062333.53403 70
EXTINCT CEMETERIES, ESTRIE
78- QC1214------------ ----
79- QC1059000000 00
80- QC0094000000 00
81- QC0000------------ ----
82- QC1345000000 00
83- QC1041000000 00
84- QC1202000000 00
85- QC1202000000 00
86- QC0000000000 00
87- QC0000000000 00
88- QC0000000000 00
89- QC0619000000 00
90- QC0000000000 00
91- QC0625000000 00
92- QC0000000000 00
93- QC0000000000 00
94- QC0000000000 00
95- QC0000000000 00
96- QC0000000000 00
97- QC0567000000 00
98- QC0000000000 00
99- QC0000000000 00
100- QC0000000000 00
101- QC0617000000 00
102- QC0626000000 00
103- QC0627000000 00
104- QC1009------------ ----
MONTÉRÉGIE
105- QC002833322.53 50
106- QC0056UnknownUnknown012.5Unknown UnknownUnknown
107- QC0059102232 30
108- QC0112100001 10
109- QC13942 The land is occasionally kept clear by a few interested people. The cemetery is lightly wooded with normal undergrowth.0 There was a fence around the cemetery in 1946. There is no evidence of a fence or a gate now.0 Nature has taken over0 It stands on private land. There is no official access route. You walk across a corner of a hay field and through the woods on the hill0 It is not even marked on the most detailed maps of the area.0 4 The best preserved parts are probably those at the bottom of the stones that are covered with top soil. The most common name on the stones is Fuller. There are at least 12 other names.0 Some stones were glued with epoxy resin in 1992 by the Knowlton Scout Troop. They also cleared brush and dead trees and made a path.
110- QC0135354553 70
111- QC013643.55553 60
112- QC13542.51134 80
113- QC0140200133 30
114- QC0147333552 40
115- QC1413UnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknown UnknownUnknown
116- QC0156UnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknown UnknownUnknown
117- QC094321.52.5132 60
118- QC0000435503 53
119- QC0000------------ ----
120- QC0000000000 00
121- QC0221222203 40
122- QC0231443564 72
123- QC0248202003 50
124- QC0000434504 46
125- QC0297222102 50
126- QC03040 (hard to locate as it is in an orchard)00 (unknown)101 20 (unknown)
127- QC0311332552 50
128- QC0312222102 50
129- QC1369--(Fenced)-------- ----
130- QC031835310 (unknown)3 30
131- QC0322231.5232 40
132- QC01292.5----3--4 70
133- QC0000232302 60
134- QC0138312553 50
135- QC000000000-- --0
136- QC0000000000 100
137- QC1010000002 (In Pettes Cemetery) 2 (In Pettes Cemetery)0
LAURENTIDES
138- QC0347 1 Surprisingly shabby for a historic site. Neglected looking, other than grass cut. 0 None now-some remnants of fencing, wire and stones along margins, encroaching neighbor with plastic pool. 0 Over grown fir trees- tree eating tombstone in one place, needs pruning, uneven ground, tricky walking. 5 Far too easy, given location. Anyone could drive in with a vehicle, etc. 3 Only for the church plus historic plaque is in French only. 1 Really needs more care 4 Mostly poor- air pollution, lack of maintenance, and time, given great age of some stones. 0 Nothing obvious at all. A few fallen stones pushed to edges of site, others probably were just removed. A family plot still has own fence but no idea of names. Some interesting stones – was affluent community in its day-but never maintained.
139- QC1410 3 Efforts to keep it tidy, but many problems. Mr. Cameron’s son helped with grass cutting last summer but doesn’t live in the area. 2 Gate and fence on one side only-can walk around it 2Overgrown trees need pruning, encroaching bush from sides, and some lichen growth. Needs some landscaping. 1 Dirt road, bushy, you need a guide to find it. Parking and entry easy when you arrive though. 3Quite impressive old-fashioned sign over main gate. 2 7 Good on remaining stones considering age; no air pollution in this remote location. 0 Some very amateur efforts at repairs and some have actually made the conditions of stones worse. Need professional help for restoration.
140- QC0000 2 Large trees have grown and died among the remaining stones, with new ones replacing them. Some trees are swallowing stones. Totally back to nature but can still make out “rows” and stones. Stones very small (about 10-12 inches showing) 0 0 The “forest primeval” surrounds and engulfs 0 Very difficult -- even our guide had to search around to find it. Off the path in the forest 0 2 There are still some small headstones and tiny foot stones remaining 0 Never had any inscriptions as community was too isolated from skilled tombstone makers and didn’t have the technology to do anything beyond cut rough stones. 0 The remoteness and secret location preserved what remains. Never any repairs.
141- QC0484 3 Grounds were reseeded and overgrown trees & roots removed in initial restoration project. Grass now kept cut. 4 Gate and fence installed at restoration project. 3 Kept tidy 3 Easy – if you have the directions 0 4 Given age and condition before restoration, as good as could be expected. 7 Most in good condition, but many missing stones. 0 The grounds were restored and have been kept tidy, but nothing has been done to the stones.
142- QC0352 3 Kept tidy by volunteers. One big pine tree in middle, all surrounded by bush. As it’s the only structure / site in area, church and cemetery have an “element of surprise” when encountered. 2 Rail fence, unlocked gate on to road. Nothing on other sides but very bushy. 2 Has church – looks very natural and woodsy, attractive setting, but needs some upkeep. Looks like it’s going back to nature. 3 Too easy for an isolated site 4 Sign on church 2 Missing stones obvious, some damages not repaired, looks a little abandoned as this is a really quiet spot. 7 Most are legible; no air pollution in this low-traffic area. 2 Some repairs. Toppled stones have been put back, but many broken stones and markers. No real conservation. Needs professional restoration. Some bits and pieces in bush at sides of site.
143- QC0283 2 Tidy lawn, but obviously many missing stones, damage from ice storm not completely repaired 3 Impressive stone & iron front wall and gate on Rte.148, but not completely fenced 2 Needs work 5 Easy. Large parking lot 5 3 7 Most legible 0 Some stones and markers piled up behind church- some used to prop up oil tank. No restorations apparent.
144- QC0245 3 Neat – no litter at present, but very bushy, rough road and then rougher track to site. On hill, rocky terrain. Very austere atmosphere 3 Fence and gate but not locked. Fence heavy-duty chicken wire. Commemorative stone amongst the graves erected in 1983. Gives brief history. 4 Natural vegetation, forest on all sides, no buildings. Height of land with beautiful view across Ottawa River 0 Tough going, but once there, easy to enter 0 “Scotch Cem.” Painted on old board on tree 10 feet up. Original sign long gone. 3 Much effort was made after 1978 when site was found to be badly vandalized and decaying. Ongoing maintenance has been done, but with difficulties. 5 Very old stones have weathering but not much air pollution. Some lichen growths 5 Needs more care, constant attention and some kind of increased security. Some leaning and sinking stones, damage from vandalism and so on. However, the Association has really made great efforts to maintain the site. A few replacement stones, ones knocked down put up again and so on.
145- QC1014 3 Fairly good. Neat, no litter, but some damage to stones 5 Locked gate and steel fence all around. Security as good as possible for location. 3 Bushy at edges-no ornamentals, no shed. 3 Would be difficult without a guide with key. Very obscure location. 5 Good sign with history of former church building, etc. 3 6 Fairly good but many older ones are fading 0 None. Fallen stones, some sinking, decorations stolen from tops of stones. A few tipping over. Pieces of broken ones still there. No money for repairs and would need to hire a skilled person.
146- QC1014 2 Scruffy – minimal care obvious. 1 Gate and fence along rue Murray, but other 3 sides look like fence removed. Steep ravine at back. 2 Grass cut but not tidy around graves. Tricky; walking-uneven. 5 Too easy. No fence on two sides. 0 2 Looks uncared for 7 Good, given age of most stones, but many missing 0 None. A few amateur cement repairs done some time ago. Some sinking stones, broken stones, leaning stones. Nothing done recently.
147- QC0000 3 Grounds neat but some broken stones Oldest part (Irish section) near front and then at one back corner 3 Impressive stone & wrought iron fence along main road, but gates not locked, and no fence on 2 sides. Vehicles can easily go in 3 A few family plots have “do it yourself” landscaping. Storage, etc at church across the road 4 Very easy; lots of parking at church 0 Nothing on cemetery 3 5 Old ones somewhat eroded-busy through-road, air pollution a factor as well as time. 4 Not yet: This is a work in progress from the restoration group organized three years ago when major vandalism was discovered. Nothing had been done for many years previously except one lone family memorial that probably replaced some missing / damaged old stones.
148- QC0000 3 Tidy but security measures very obvious – double fence with padlocks, church has metal shutters, alarm system, etc. Pretty church. 4 The most secured site in my inventory 5 Well kept. Exceptionally skilled custodian. 3 Easy if you know the way-Have to go with custodian with keys 4 On church 3 Many missing stones. 7 Off the beaten track so little pollution problems. 0 Some replacement stones by families as many have been stolen and/or vandalized in past. A few repairs but no real restorations. Some stones sinking
149- QC0000 2 Lumpy ground underfoot, needs some landscaping, overgrown around edges; three sides completely surrounded by buildings and a steep drop to the river 2 Some remains of fencing, old gate with crumbling pillars needs restoration 2 Needs tidying up. On edge of escarpment overlooking river-could be made a lot more attractive 1 Down lane, behind original Shaw family home. Invisible from street 0 No sign anywhere. Unless you know where to go, it can’t be found. 3 Given age, not too bad, but needs work. Good survival of most old stones, but earliest ones are missing, and some may have been made of wood. 6 Fairly good, but some erosion of inscriptions. Off of the main highways so not much pollution 0 Nothing evident. Some broken, others leaning. Some bits and pieces in bushes. Needs serious conservation efforts. Missing stones
150- QC1015 2 Not too good, clean but looks neglected 0 4 Beside church and hall, natural vegetation – mossy. 5 Too easy-open to road 4 Just for church 2 6 Some weathering. 2 A few amateur repairs evident- many sinking and missing stones.
151- QC1016 3 Clean but very bucolic, natural ground cover, backs on to old barn Very beautiful location 4 Found main gate eventually. Fence all around 3 Abuts old farm that is now likely a second home. Bushy but neatly kept – no litter 3 A bit hard to find. Had to climb through fence as gate not apparent 0 2 Grass cut -- that’s all. Broken stones probably removed - many burials have no stones now. 7 Good as no air pollution-remote area with dirt roads, little traffic, but obviously many missing stones. 0 No conservation obvious at all. In isolated sparsely inhabited area. Few working farms left, most of the few houses here are now second homes and empty during the week
152- QC0000 3 No litter, but a bit neglected looking; rough under foot in spots. Not in an attractive part of town, looks out on to some shabby properties. 3 Old fashioned gates, fencing all around but wouldn’t keep anyone out 2 Bushy at back – could be better maintained. 4 Easy; lots of parking. 2 On church 3 As the church isn’t really active any more, it looks deserted. 8 Good on remaining stones; not much traffic, off the beaten path area. No pollution and remaining stones not that old. 0 Many missing stones, broken ones probably just taken away. Could be kept somewhere but didn’t see anything in surrounding bush or near church.
153- QC0000 2 On slope, grass cut but needs serious pruning of bushes-some stones being swallowed. 2 Barbed wire in places and antique gate-not in good condition. Not locked. 1 Bushes all around, encroaching on the small burial ground. Church needs restoration/repairs. 5 3 (Sign for church) 2 Located at great distance from the few volunteer helpers, so hard to maintain 7 Good – but many missing stones; bushes need to be cleared away from some. 0 Some sinking, many missing – nothing has been done. Needs help.
SAGUENAY-LAC-SAINT-JEAN
154- QC000034353 ???3 70
155- QC000033.54402 60
156- QC0000------------ ----
157- QC0000------------ ----
OUTAOUAIS
159- QC0000------------ ----
158- QC0000 0 4 Crab apple trees – kept neat but natural. 3 Steep; not much parking but then, not much traffic either! 2 On church 2 Some stones missing, some leaning, a couple not aligned 7 Not that old and no air pollution; some lichen growth. 0 Some replacements and new stones marking old burials, but no restoration / conservation work.

TABLE FOUR:

ITEM QC Code Management (20 Pts) Records (10 Pts) Other Threats (20 Pts) Total Points Comments / Recommendations
Incorporated association, committee or other custodian (historical society, municipality, church, family, etc.) (0-5 Pts) Level of involvement (number and age of volunteers, existence of paid staff, etc.) (0-5 Pts) Endowment; other long-term funding strategies (0-10 Pts) Cemetery map; accuracy and completeness of documentation of burials (0-10 Pts) Low-risk from vandalism, theft, encroachment by nearby properties, environmental damage, or other external threats (20 Pts Add up all the points to get a total out of 100
ESTRIE
1- QC12032100419 #C97 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Lakeside Cemetery in Dudswell does minimal maintenance on this orphan cemetery. This includes occasional mowing and brush cutting. The fence is in good repair. Most of the stones, however , are broken and the pieces have been grouped in the centre under a engraved wooden memorial with the names of those buried (and “Maybe Other”). Only 3 or 4 of the larger stones are in their original locations. Very isolated.
2- QC054852251038.5 The cemetery is at risk because of its location surrounded by a farm with no clear access road. Leslie Nutbrown Oct 2007
3- QC05505325535 The cemetery is at risk because of its location in the in the middle of a field with no access road. Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
4- QC057942051037 The cemetery is at risk because of its remote location in the woods. Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
5- QC000042251010+ The cemetery is trimmed once a year I think. The ground is uneven with poor access into the cemetery. Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
6- QC00005325535 The cemetery is at risk because of its location in the in the middle of a field with no access road. Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
7- QC05815225542 The cemetery is at risk because of its location surrounded by a farm. Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
8- QC000043051048 The cemetery is at risk because it is looked after by descendants and who knows how long this will continue? Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
9- QC00483235949 The cemetery is at risk. There is a group made up of descendants of those interred here but funding for maintenance is/will be a problem. Leslie Nutbrown Oct. 2007
10- QC00572105949 Russell Nichols reported that some of the stones in this graveyard were tipped over. The grounds are mowed by volunteers from the local historical society
11- QC05924325739 The cemetery is at risk because of its location in the woods, its small size and poor access. Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
12- QC059311001023 The cemetery is high risk. The stones were all moved to a small plot, therefore nobody knows the true boundaries or where the bodies are interred. Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
13- QC00881 (Repairs undertaken by members of the Doak family) 1051036 This cemetery was “restored” by members of the Doak family at their own expense. It was fenced off and is bordered by a farmer's field. A wall made of brick was erected in 1983 and the old stones were removed from their original locations and embedded in the wall. Some of the bricks in the wall have begun to crumble.
14- QC00890004318 Small private cemetery, some of the stones are broken and partially illegible. Difficult to find even though it is adjacent to the road. Fenced and mowed occasionally. According to Russell Nichols, some of the original stones have disappeared over the years and the size of the cemetery has been reduced by encroachment by the neigbouring farm.
15- QC1022----------- #C3 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map
16- QC01501100020 The Hyatt Burial Ground is on private property, but the caretaker seems to be mowing the lawn. There has long been a fence around the burial ground, so it is at least set apart from the rest of the property. The Loomises would like to determine for sure if Loyalists are buried here, and ideally secure proper legal access to the site.
17- QC05624325028 The cemetery is high risk because of its location surrounded by farmland.
18- QC000025301011.5 The cemetery is high risk because it was abandoned for years and only just being restored. Russell Nichols states that some 10-15 stones were removed some time ago to Mount Forest Cemetery in Coaticook.
19- QC00000000412.5 This cemetery is very difficult to find and is not visible from the road. It is completely overgrown. As it is situated on a knoll, however, it is not at risk from the Coaticook River, and does not seem to be at immediate risk from the landowner. At one time, someone erected a rough fence around the site, possibly the landowner.
20- QC01720205539 This cemetery is adjacent to the road on private property. According to Russell Nichols, some years ago, the neighbouring farmer removed the fence around the graveyard under the guise of getting rid of the brush from around the edges. When the fence was re-installed, however, the size of the cemetery was diminished considerably – a perfect example of how cemeteries situated on private land are at risk from encroachment.
21- QC06103325237.5 At risk because it is completey surrounded by farmland with no access road.
22- QC061532071547 --
23- QC14162 (Apparently the municipality pays someone to mow the lawn occasionally)005039 Cleaned up in the 1960s, Recently most of the stones were separated from their burial plots and lined up in a straight row for easy maintenance. The only plot to escape this “restoration” was the enclosed Bill plot
24- QC10213205539 #C2 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. This old cemetery with its scattered stones is in good shape considering it is generally isolated and unknown from most people. It has a fence and a gate. Most of the stones are legible and the cemetery is kept mowed. I do not know who maintains this cemetery. It appears to have been used from about 1850 to 1926.
25- QC1202000104 #C6 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Totally abandoned and overgrown. Surrounded by farmland; free access to cows. Extreme risk. **Some years ago, the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association reported that at least 2 stones had been salvaged from a nearby farmhouse, where they were being used as steps.
26- QC02763215037 Burials in this churchyard are now quite rare. This graveyard is frequently the target of vandalism, and that one risk factor alone places on this list. Though the grounds are well tended, the stones are badly neglected and at least half are n need of repair
27- QC0000------------ No information
28- QC14271000013.5 A fence has been maintained over the years, but a large tree has grown up and one of the stones is broken. The property has recently been sold to new owners.
29- QC0000------------ #C76 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground.
30- QC1235------------ #C72 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground.
31- QC1257------------ #C74 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground.
32- QC1056------------ #C73 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground.
33- QC1234------------ #C75 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground.
34- QC10493.52 (A paid caretaker mows lawn but effects no repairs whatsoever)760 (Theft, vandalism and neglect of stones are all problems)48.5 #C66 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. This cemetery is located on an isolated road and has been subject to theft (several round elements have been stolen from obelisks) and vandalism (broken stones). The cemetery has a healthy bank account ($41,000), but the association is also semi-dormant and needs to be rejuvenated with new blood and volunteers before further damage due to vandalism and neglect occurs. (An effort on the part of Isabell MacArthur Beattie is aimed at doing this). The fact that the cemetery has been designated a heritage site may offer some new funding and manpower options if the municipality becomes involved.
35- QC10471105019 #C63 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. According to Isabell MacArthur Beattie, there is talk of moving the stones from this cemetery to nearby Sand Hill Cemetery (Whitton). The cemetery is becoming overgrown and neglected, though the lawn is occasionally mowed.
36- QC12100005013 #C65 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. This cemetery is completely overgrown and situated well in the woods. It is quite difficult to find. Isabell MacArthur Beattie remembers it when she was a child (her family’s house was just below the hill). She also remembers the last burial in 1947, when her father brought the body up to the graveyard in a wagon (the road was already neglected). About ten gravestones are visible amid the trees, and are in surprisingly good condition.
37- QC1054------------ #C71 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground.
38- QC12190000527 #C92 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. There are 8 lovely gravestones in this small burial ground, all in excellent condition, legible and unbroken. The cemetery has been mowed occasionally and someone has obviously taken care not to damage the stones. The fence and gate are deteriorating. Access is across private property.
39- QC120722051044 #C96 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. A number of the stones have been broken in half and are lying on the ground.
40- QC1029------------ --
41- QC1058------------ #C81 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. No information available on this early burial ground. May be extinct.
42- QC1037000003 #C41 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. This cemetery is in its last stages of neglect. The 2 remaining (visible) stones are broken and abandoned. A farm fence partially encircles the site, but cows are still able to enter. The site is also overgrown with mature trees. A granite and cement monument reads: “Site of Prescott Cemetery 1840-1900 – Tribute to Families Laid to Rest Here. One of the stones bears the date 1916.
43- QC106421001028 #C94 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. All of the original headstones have removed to Lakeside Cemetery in Dudswell, but a monument has been erected – “Hardings Corner Pioneer Cemetery 1833-1897 -- A Tribute to Our Pioneers,” as well as an inscribed boulder and a sign on the gate. The Breton Plant is immediately adjacent to the cemetery, and on the other side is a large mass of crushed rock. No maintenance is performed on the wooded grounds.
44- QC103121051036 #C17 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. There is only one stone in this graveyard – a monument erected to the pioneers buried here. Apparently the original stones have been replaced. The volunteers on the committee who currently look after this graveyard are apparently quite elderly with no one as yet to replace them.
45- QC00001103019.5 Cemetery grounds are well maintained but the stones are worn and many are broken and illegible.
46- QC0000------------ Completely abandoned. All the gravestones, except one, are said to bear no inscriptions. No other data available.
47- QC01252214532.5 This cemetery needs to be monitored. It’s location behind a drinking establishment could lead to vandalism. Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
48- QC00002205537.5 --
49- QC1417------------ More data required. Abandoned, possibly extinct. In 1993, a cemetery review committee judged the site “obsolete and impossible to maintain.” No other data available. According to Esther Healy (RCHS), the gravestones were fieldstones without inscriptions.
50- QC0000------------ No data available.
51- QC058012001046.5 This tiny burying ground is well maintained. Two stones are fairly modern and have replaced 2 older ones. The site is right off the road and has a small walkway and gate to get to it.
52- QC05811000523.5 This interesting pioneer family cemetery is in remarkably good condition, with most stones readable, even the 2 that are roughly inscribed natural stones. Also, someone has clearly been looking after the site, and the one badly broken stone has been restored using an interesting (and conservation-friendly) method that consists of re-mounting the top half of the broken stone by means of an aluminum frame; no mortar or epoxy is needed. Nevertheless, the fact that the site is on private property places it at risk.
53- QC0582000004 This burying ground is at a severe risk. Most of the gravestones, some very early, have been broken very recently, since all the cracks are fresh – and this despite the fact that the burial ground is walled and far from the road. The damage may have been done by someone in the vicinity. Without immediate action, this cemetery will be completely lost.
54- QC00001 (Bryant family)1035 (Fenced and cared for by descendants19 Stones need serious attention. Cemetery was once overgrown but was cleared and fenced by the descendants.
55- QC1348------------ No other information. This cemetery has not been investigated yet.
56- QC0000------------ No information. The cemetery is no longer indicated on maps, nor was Matthew Farfan able to locate it in 2007.
57- QC00603.5355548.5 There are many beautiful old slate stones in this graveyard. The grounds are well maintained and the access is good, but many of the oldest stones are in poor shape and little care has been taken to preserve them. For this reason, this still-active cemetery is at risk.
58- QC00000105521 The cemetery is high risk. The one stone has been enclosed in a protective box with plexiglass. Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
59- QC134020051131.5 This tiny family burial ground is maintained by the landowner. Someone has epoxied one of the stones, which was broken. The site is on private property, which by nature places it at risk, but it is relatively isolated and free from apparent danger.
60- QC0123------------ No other information
61- QC1353000408 This early burial ground is at extreme risk. It is completely abandoned and overgrown, despite the fact that a burial occurred as late as 1931. Most of the stones are leaning or damaged, though some are intact. A campground nearby also poses a potential risk for casual vandalism.
62- QC0000------------ No other information. This cemetery has not been investigated yet.
63- QC00000005110 The cemetery is high risk. It is abandoned.
64- QC0602000008 This very early, very high-risk, cemetery has some beautiful slate stones, but is completely abandoned and overgrown. There is no longer access, since the town has apparently sold off an old town road leading to the site (recalled by Jim Wharry as a child). The cemetery has also been the subject of theft on at least 2 occasions, one neighbour using a headstone as a step, another taking one because it was his ancestor (1811). The latter has been returned and awaits restoration to the graveyard. The nearby Brookside Cemetery hopes to clear up title to this cemetery and restore it to some order.
65- QC0000100002 The landowner only allows descendants to visit the graveyard, which is in its last stages of degradation. Kevin Pryce would like to have the site restored, if possible. He feels strongly about preserving family history. Note: Local environmentalist Stewart Hopps was a member of this family.
66- QC13453.52251041.5 This early burial ground is maintained by an association, but the graveyard is surrounded by private land. Trustees have requested financial aid from QAHN to help to restore the cemetery: stones need cleaning and repair, fence needs upkeep. Volunteers keep the grass mowed.
67- QC0000000006 This very early burying ground has long been abandoned. This cemetery is abandoned. There are 3 slate headstones among the trees. Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
68- QC13434235541.5 About half of the gravestones are broken and there seems to be little activity here beyond basic lawn mowing and fence maintenance. This cemetery was brought back from the bush a few years ago, but the stones are in serious need of attention. Very isolated. There is still the occasional burial.
69- QC0600000349.5 This graveyard is completely abandoned, overgrown with trees, and in a pitiful state. Most of the stones are broken and lying on the ground, though about 6 are in excellent condition. A few are barely legible. A number of stones (8-10) are simple rough stones with no markings whatsoever.
70- QC0616------------ In 1993, the SHS reported that this cemetery was abandoned and had only one stone left in it. M. Farfan looked for the cemetery in November 2007, but could find no trace of it. It may now be extinct.
71- QC060611051237 Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
72- QC1011000002 Overgrown and completely abandoned and in disarray. Superb hilltop location overlooking Missisquoi River. Many of the stones are broken or lying flat; several are un-inscribed stones. The entire site is overgrown with lilac bushes, perhaps planted generations before. This early burial ground is at severe risk.
73- QC1332------------ Overgrown and abandoned. No other information.
74- QC13424235542 Many of the gravestones are broken and leaning, and although the Mansonville Cemetery Co. is the custodian, there seems to be little activity here beyond basic lawn mowing and fence maintenance.
75- QC00001102026 For many years, this cemetery was completely abandoned, with no care whatsoever from the church. It was the subject of frequent vandalism and many of the stones were broken or lost. In the 1990s, a few volunteers from the SHS salvaged the stones they could and arranged them around a cross-shaped mound, and a fence, gate and sign erected. Unfortunately the damage was already done and most of the stones were separated from their original locations. This was really a salvage operation. Today, the cemetery is still largely uncared for except for the occasional volunteer lawn mowing.
76- QC0251------------ Overgrown and abandoned. No other information.
77- QC062312051041.5 Some stones are lying flat on the ground Leslie Nutbrown Nov. 2007
78- QC1214------------ #C93 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Not a trace remains of this old burial ground, though the gravestones were removed to Lakeside, nearby.
79- QC1059000000 #C82 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. According to Isabell MacArthur Beattie, this graveyard contains the body of a boy who drowned, among others. However, no traces remain of the cemetery.
80- QC0094000000 #C20 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Apparently there are no remaining traces of this early pioneer graveyard. One burial was discovered when the road was built.
81- QC0000------------ No other information. Some of the stones that were discarded may still be near the edge of the old cemetery property.
82- QC134500000 The Jones Burial Ground has been completely obliterated (bulldozed) and the gravestones discarded. There is no trace of it now.
83- QC1041000000 #C45 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. According to Isabell MacArthur Beattie, this graveyard is completely overgrown. There are no visible gravestones and no sign.
84- QC1202000000 #C7 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Apparently no traces remain of this burial site.
85- QC1202000000 #C8 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Apparently no traces remain of this burial site.
86- QC0000000000 #C33 on the Megantic Compton Cemetery and Church Association map. Apparently there are no remaining traces of this early pioneer graveyard.
87- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
88- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
89- QC0619000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
90- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
91- QC0625000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
92- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
93- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
94- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
95- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
96- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
97- QC0567000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
98- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
99- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
100- QC0000000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
101- QC0617000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
102- QC0626000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
103- QC0627000000 Small private burial grounds or neighbourhood graveyards, now completely gone.
104- QC1009------------ This cemetery was paved over to make way for a parking lot in 1977. Some of the stones were moved to Pine Hill Cemetery in Magog, and are located near the back by the shed.
MONTÉRÉGIE
105- QC00282 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery Fund)5 (included on MHS Twilight Graveyard Tour No. 3)639.5 Information about this cemetery found in the Twilight Graveyard Tour No. 3, August 9, 2003.  Inaccessibility to site meant our data was incomplete.
106- QC00562005 (included on MHS Twilight Graveyard Tour No. 3)Unknown10.5 (**incomplete data) MHS sign marks the location but located out in a field, totally inaccessible. It is highly likely that this site is much neglected because of the access difficulties. Inaccessibility to site meant our data was incomplete.
107- QC00592 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (MHS Graveyard Tour No. 4, Aug. 7, 2004)1035 The gravestones were mounted into a brick and mortar wall some years ago by the MHS. The result is an easy-to-care for row of monuments with very little connection to the cemetery arrangement that once stood here. MF
108- QC01122 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (on file at MHS)0 (unknown)15 The cemetery is situated in the middle of a corn field. Almost all of the stones are illegible. All of the stones are pieces of rock that have been marked with a simple sharp tool. At one time Mr. Fox, who lived on Railroad Street in Dunham, had information on this cemetery.
109- QC13940002 No map. The Scouts in 1992 made a list of the inscriptions. This is in the Brome County Historical Society archives.0 The cemetery is owned by the same man who owns the gravel pit. The edge of the pit is about 30 yards from the closest gravestone. There is no mention of the cemetery in Mr. Allard’s deeds, even though the Municipality asked him, by letter dated 16 Dec 2004, to have his notary put it in. Mr. Allard did, however, give the Town Council a verbal promise in 2004 that he would not harm the cemetery.9 At risk. The cemetery is on private land, abandoned, with an operational gravel pit nearby. There needs to be some research to find out who the people buried here were.
110- QC01351 (? Family)1Unknown5 (documents in MHS Cemetery files)543 --
111- QC0136UnknownUnknownUnknown10 (Listed in book by Brenda Wilson Birch, 2004)546.5 (**Partial data) Good sized lot, trimmed, maintained, fenced but with a number of broken stones piled in corner of site; many leaning stones; little evidence of repair work. Not recently used, but apparently future burials planned. The data is incomplete so it is possible the grade for this cemetery should be higher (e.g., if there is an association caring for it, and if there is an endowment).
112- QC13542 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (listed on MHS Twilight Graveyard Tour No. 4, Aug. 7, 2004)9 (threat of cattle; isolated)40.5 --
113- QC01402 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (included on MHS Graveyard Tour No. 3, Aug. 9, 2003)9 (Gophers!)33 MHS sign marks the location but located out in a field, totally inaccessible. It is highly likely that this site is much neglected because of the access difficulties. Inaccessibility to site meant our data was incomplete.
114- QC0147UnknownUnknownUnknown10 (Listed in book form by Brenda Wilson Birch)5 (stones broken and lying on ground)40 (**incomplete data) Important graveyard as it contains many early Loyalist burials..
115- QC1413UnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknown-- Situated on private land; difficult access; not marked from the road. Limited data.
116- QC0156UnknownUnknownUnknownUnknownUnknown(**Incomplete data) --
117- QC09432 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery Fund)5 (included on MHS Twilight Graveyard Tour, No. 1, Aug. 11, 2001)636 “Nigger Rock” is believed to be the only known burial ground in Canada for blacks who were born and died in slavery. In 2003, a plaque was presented to the municipality by the Government of Quebec. It reads (in French): “Oral tradition holds that near here, at a place known as Nigger Rock, many black slaves were buried between 1794 and 1833. To commemorate the 170th anniversary of the abolition of slavery, the government dedicates this plaque to the memory of the victims of the tragedy of slavery and hopes to restore their human dignity.” The cemetery contains no gravestones.
118- QC00000 (unknown)0 (unknown)0 (unknown)0 (unknown)0 (unknown)28 Although the site is open, mowed and trimmed, there are broken stones piled in the corner. Many stones are leaning and cracked. Transcription needed on many stones. 15–20 stones need attention.
119- QC0000------------ Apparently ill-kept. Stones in bad need of repair. No other information yet.
120- QC000000001018
121- QC02214255 (documentation in MHS Cemetery files)536 The cemetery is not very accessible. It is located out in a field, very overgrown with cedar and pine trees, and no grass cutting recently. It is so overgrown in some corners that the stones are no longer visible. Lots of stones broken, leaning and cracked. Fence is damaged and some stones are located outside of fence. 15-20 stones need attention.
122- QC0231UnknownUnknownUnknown5 (documented in MHS files)544 Still in use but not active, grounds neat, trimmed, clean, some stones leaning, one large monument has a severe lean, 1 stone fallen. 1-5 stones need attention.
123- QC02482 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (on MHS Twilight Graveyard Tour, August 2002)529 Data is limited.
124- QC00003 Private (unknown)2 Private (unknown)(unknown)5 (documented in MHS Cemetery files)545 Small, clean, trimmed, obviously cared for and maintained.
125- QC02970000519 Inaccessible without permission. Irregular maintenance; leaning and broken stones. No further data.
126- QC0304010 (unknown)5 (on file at MHS)010 **This site could not be located. It is highly likely it has been destroyed by the orchard owner.
127- QC03110 (unknown)0 (unknown)0 (unknown)5 (on file at MHS)939 Many problems: broken, fallen, dirty and cracked stones; fence in disrepair; 6-12 stones need attention. There was an endowment fund of $2,500 as of 1973, but we do not know who is/was in charge of it.
128- QC031252 (2 men mow lawn)5 (private donations)10844 Inaccessible without permission; leaning and broken stones; irregular maintenance.
129- QC1369----------(**Incomplete data) Cared for but showing signs of neglect. Fenced. Church nearby is now a private home. Stones need straightening and cleaning. Cemetery used within the last 10 years. Is this also known as Farnham Glenn. If not, then we could not locate Farnham Glen.
130- QC03182 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (Included in the Missisquoi Historical Society’s Twilight Graveyard Tour, No. 3, August 9, 2003)0 (unknown)30 --
131- QC03222 (MHS Cemetery Committee)2 (1 man mows)3 (Cemetery fund)5 (Included in the Missisquoi Historical Society’s Twilight Graveyard Tour, No. 3, August 9, 2003)1039.5 Located in orchard but marked by MHS green sign. Fairly protected and fenced. Crooked stones and transcribing should be done on remaining stones as they are very faded.
132- QC0129------5---- A few of the stones have been replaced. Most are in excellent condition for their age.
133- QC00002105026 Ill kept, many broken stones. The graveyard is still (apparently) being used for the occasional family burial.
134- QC0138UnknownUnknownUnknown81042 --
135- QC0000Unknown----5 (MHS list)--5 (**incomplete data) Most of the burial stones are stored in the basement of the church as they were getting stolen to make paving stones. Many newcomers do not even know that this WAS a cemetery. The only standing gravestone is an obelisk that marks the grave of Townsend, but the green space is definitely a graveyard.
136- QC000055551040** The vault was looted and vandalized c.1915. In the 1950s, it was bulldozed on the orders of the then landowner. The inscribed tablet from above the door was preserved by the Missisquoi Historical Society. Since then, an archaeological study by Gérard Gagné has confirmed the presence of 7 sets of bones, which are consistent with the remains of Sir John and his family. The site will eventually be transferred to Société de restauration du patrimoine Sir John Johnson (or some other body), the vault restored using the original inscribed tablet iron door and stones from the vault. The bones and other artifacts will also be returned to the restored vault. Proper title and access will also have to be secured to the site. The site has been declared an archaeological site by the Government of Quebec, File No. BiFg-1. **These points will no doubt increase once the restoration of the site takes place.
137- QC10100005 (Information seems complete)00** **The early pioneer cemetery was obliterated in the 1950s in the name of progress. The stones were salvaged and removed to Knowlton, but the bodies probably still remain. So technically it is still a burial ground.
LAURENTIDES
138- QC03471 Two volunteer custodians No specific organization for cemetery1 One over 70, other over 80 years of age. Concern for future.4 Cemetery funded by Diocese-not enough money to do much Families have moved away and/or died out.8 Map and list done by Bob Alderson in 1986-excellen, but needs an update. Burial records are good.8 Historic status and good shape of church plus it’s in a residential area. These offer protection from vandalism, but cemetery very neglected and encroached upon by neighboring property. Lots of air pollution and weathering.36 At risk. The very poor condition of the cemetery is in stark contrast to the well-kept church. However, the church is now a “community centre/cultural locale” with only a few religious services a year. The cemetery should be protected, fenced with gate, the stones restored and maintained. Trees need to be pruned asap also as they are growing around the stones, even swallowing them. Great heritage importance for Argenteuil area.
139- QC14100 Nothing; would be a good project for a historical group, community organization or museum.1 Very senior – no paid help – a real concern.07 Map and list recorded in 1979; needs an update0 Very high risk; isolated but still has had serious vandalism.28 There are broken stones and corner markers piled under large fir tree. Some old stones have had their inscriptions written over in black paint – looks terrible. This old cemetery is of great heritage interest. Could be very attractive if restored as on high hill with good view, the usual type of site for Highland Scots cemeteries.
140- QC00001 Family, although they never owned this property. Could be project for historical or archeological group.0 Four Brown family members, the only ones who know where it is. No upkeep00 Stephen Brown knows the names of a few of those buried there.0 Natural environment has long ago claimed this site. Could also be other threats.5 Impossible to rate- Maybe 10 for caretaking family and 10 just for surviving? At high risk. Stephen Brown would like assistance now in declaring this a heritage site with some form of protection, as there are fears for development in area. Unless you knew this site was there, it would be invisible to most people. This is an amazing survival given our climate and vigorous flora. Jim Kyle and I were the first people outside this family to be shown this site and promised not to bring anyone there without permission and accompaniment of Stephen Brown.
141- QC04840 Only volunteers- all quite elderly now. No organization 1 Appears to be the 2 MacCallum sisters (one over 90). Very concerned about the future of site. Interest from a few other relatives of those buried but they all live at a distance.05 Made own map and list of burials from remaining stones. Can’t find records anywhere although they have searched and contacted various sources0 This old cemetery is at risk as there is no one to continue caring for it and even its legal ownership is unknown. No one involved with it lives near it.30 At risk- This site could be a project for a community and/or historical organization in the area. Some intervention should be made soon. This information has been provided by Edith MacCallum by telephone as the snow prevented me from seeing this site. Also, I am requesting photos, if there are any, from a cousin of the MacCallums via email. I will definitely visit this site in the spring.
142- QC03524 Covered by the more active church in Lakefield (Holy Trinity). Some recent renewed interest from some younger people and present municipal administration of Gore.3 No more than 6 volunteers; none live close to the site. Older middle-aged and seniors6 There is a cemetery fund but nothing long-term planned yet. Seems vague. Again, what are they waiting for if monies exist?5 Bob Alderson did good map and list in 1986. Not many records found from earliest times. Should be updated and further research done.0 Isolated location but on through-roads; easy to “hit” Church has experienced many incidents of vandalism and thefts. No environmental problems though.43 At risk. Needs support from community. Some renewed interest and several newspaper articles, etc., have increased public awareness, but no plan of action seems forthcoming. Cemetery needs professional restoration. Some members of “congregation” (once a year service now) are reluctant to consider changes to use of church building and realities of the condition of the whole site. Difficult for excellent warden (Jim Kyle) and his support group.
143- QC02833 Volunteer group trying to raise money to restore church-small number of people. Applied to Quebec for grant2 All over 65 years0 Had fund years back but it was put in with general fund for church. Trouble raising money for repairs7 Has a 1978 map and list – probably some of the earliest records may be missing. Stones missing since that time. Needs update, further research.0 Trees fell on stones in ice storm and no repairs made yet. Some vandalism to hall and church. Open location on main road may discourage vandalism. Church is crumbling, structure unsound.39 At risk. This very beautiful and historic church and cemetery on an excellent site need help. Small congregation has difficulties raising money and has had little support from United Church of Canada. Should be designated an historic site. Note: St. Mungo was/is the patron saint and name of cathedral church, of Glasgow, Scotland.
144- QC02454 Well organized corporation with a web site. Has yearly meetings and wants to purchase more surrounding land as a buffer zone. About 60 members.2 Only about 6 real volunteers, all seniors. Concern for future4 Donations – only a few of the members ever donate. Doesn’t appear to be any real long-term strategies in place.7 Cemetery list from 1977-78 with very minimal map. Good information though. Needs an update.0 High risk from seasonal “partiers” and vandals, and all-terrain vehicles going through. Police not too helpful. No houses in immediate area. Looks abandoned even though it isn’t40 At risk. With all good intentions, the problems facing this site are beyond the resources and skills of the cemetery association, none of whom live near the site and all of whom are older people. The road is a “sheep track” for the last mile before approaching the site and then peters out into the bush. There are ruins of the former farming settlement, deserted for at least 50 years, in the woods all around. However, this is the oldest burial site of all those I’ve seen and given its history, should be declared an historic site and much better protected. This site is of immense genealogical and heritage importance.
145- QC10141 St. John’s Anglican Church Corporation However, the Church is closed, and there is no congregation any more and no priest since death of Canon Baugh. The plan is to sell the building.2 Only the Couvrettes in the 1970s and concerned for the future care of cemetery.6 There is a “perpetual fund” to take of the cemetery, but with so few volunteers, who will administer this in the future?5 Map exists in Canon Baugh’s effects -- present location unsure. Would be burial records at Anglican archives in Montreal. 5 Rather isolated location, far from village and church. Some farms nearby, but generally deserted. Hard to find unless you know where it is. This is often a protection but can also be a problem.48 The uncertain future of St. John’s Church and the lack of volunteers put this site at risk. It is, like the other New Glasgow cemetery, of great heritage interest. The Couvrettes have done their best to take care of the site but are concerned for the future.
146- QC10140 May have been at one time, but members died and were not replaced.000 Must be records somewhere but no one knows where.0 Housing development on one side appears to encroach on cemetery property. Ground bulldozed, fence probably removed if there had been one. Busy highway may deter actual vandalism but this site is neglected.19 Although there have been a few recent burials, this cemetery looks very neglected. Very much at risk. This is an important heritage site for one of the earliest Scots settlements along the North River. There once was a church near the cemetery but it burned down long ago and was never replaced. New Glasgow has declined over the years and now there are really no English-speaking residents. When contacted some years ago by Canon Horace Baugh from the Anglican Church in New Glasgow, the United Church wanted the Anglicans to take on this cemetery and wanted nothing to do with it.
147- QC00005 Cemetery restoration group: has had support from St. Patrick’s Society, QAHN, and some good local media coverage. Has website, held successful fundraiser last January.4 Serious volunteers, but no one full time resident near St. Columban. Mainly older and middle aged people, mostly descendants of the Irish settlers.8 Appear to be doing well with funding but the restoration project looks very expensive. It may be difficult to maintain interest and momentum from volunteer base.5 There are 3 maps, but oldest and middle are missing. Partial records only. This needs more research, as data is probably available from archives of diocese.0 More damage to stones was noticed this past summer. The site is in “centreville” St. Columban, but would be deserted after 5 pm.-school on one side, town hall facing, and garage on other side. No-one around a lot of the time.47 Many supporters of this restoration project live outside area- and outsi de Quebec - some have never been to St. Columban. Old stones of Irish residents were vandalized and thrown away into bush behind church. These are now at home of a restoration committee member awaiting work and final project to return them to the site. Still many broken and leaning stones in cemetery. Still at risk. Important heritage site. Vandalism a major concern.
148- QC00003 Cemetery corporation 1 Bert Ward is 83 years old, very competent, and very concerned for the future. This site would ideally need a local full time resident like him to look after it.7 Endowment fund. Interest covers the upkeep. No idea how much – probably reluctant to spend much money. (Bert’s labor is volunteer)3 No map, but a recent list. Earliest burials not known. Could probably be researched from archives of Diocese.5 As stated, the site now resembles a minimum-security prison- church a real bunker – sad comment on on-going history of vandalism. Concern for future48 This site was difficult to assess as it really is “at risk” for the future given that the present only active custodian is 83. The location is very isolated which can be both positive and negative. However, many local people trace roots to this area so possibly potential interest in maintaining heritage site. Diocese indifferent -- no regular priest, the usual. If the Wards weren’t involved, this site probably would have been totally destroyed.
149- QC00004 Shawbridge United Church Corporation- active, year around parish that has benefited from recent population expansion in Lower Laurentians. Also several pioneer-era families still support church0 Some problems with volunteer staff-not reliable recently. Not many actual volunteers6 Has fairly good endowment funding. Just using interest to cover grass cutting.7 Map and list exist. Good records go back to 1815, but probably incomplete. Don’t know where all the burials are. Crowded cemetery.8 Concerns about access lane as the Shaw house has new owner. Surrounded by residential properties-concerns about encroachments. Also very steep cliff could suffer erosion. Vandalism not likely as in busy residential area.43 Records of burials to 1815 but remaining stones date only to 1860s. Cemetery is 30 to 50 years older than church. Needs professional conservation and landscaping, and fences and gate restored. Church and cemetery should try for historic site status. Important Laurentian heritage location. At risk: even though present church congregation is fairly active, the cemetery is not a priority.
150- QC10153 Not apart from church corporation3 A few volunteers older middle to senior aged4 From general church funds1 No map, no list done There would be actual death records only at the Diocese archives5 Had incidents of vandalism, pushed over stones although these were re-erected. In busy residential area, but looks abandoned41 At risk. This historic church presently has no rector and the congregation is ageing. Also, Arundel has had a well maintained community cemetery for many years now. However, the Grace Church site is of great heritage interest and should be conserved and repaired. The pretty church has an excellent hilltop location overlooking the village. Mr. Boyd is very concerned for the future of the site.
151- QC10161 Nothing organized at present. May have been something many years ago. This site doesn’t belong to the adjoining property: it was discovered that it can’t be sold either. No clear idea of who owns it.1 One ill and elderly man (L. Staniforth) Sometimes his son helps, but son doesn’t live in the area. Only cuts grass.0 There used to be a fund to cover upkeep but no one knows its status now. Cemetery inactive. Mrs. Gray concerned about future.0 None. Burials probably recorded civilly – not connected to any church for several years7 Local residents keep an eye on things but this site looks deserted. Discovered gate to main road is not locked-could be a problem. Extreme isolation may protect but can also be a problem.31 At risk. There are no provisions for its future upkeep and research should be done as to who is legal owner. It has the air of a family burial ground but does not belong to any one family. This is an area of very low population density and most of the full time residents are seniors.
152- QC00002 Nothing specific for cemetery – cared for by Arundel church corporation No clergy assigned to St. George’s anymore.1 Only Bob Sinclair, in 70’s – can “only dig small hole for ashes” now; can’t handle caskets –families have to make own arrangements.5 There appears to be a seldom-used endowment fund, only the interest is used to pay worker if needed. Interest has been allowed to accumulate.0 No one knows8 Residential area and open location, so low risk of vandalism so far. However, site looks neglected, no full time congregation any more at church -- the usual sad story of a dwindling community.41 At risk. The cemetery has become a mixed ecumenical site with first United Church and then Plymouth Brethern being buried there (at one end) and Anglicans (at other end). Unique. This was, in some ways, a good move for the future – to share, and all groups have participated in upkeep. However, conservation is needed for many stones and generally more attention. Mr. Sinclair is very concerned for the future of the site.
153- QC00001 Volunteers- Jeanie & Fernand Boutin do their best but limited by lack of funding and help.2 Young, fit seniors, but great concern for future.0 Nothing – church itself is volunteer dependent- not much support from the Diocese.2 A map is being prepared.0 Church has been vandalized – isolated location and right on road-easy to “hit”.28 At risk. Church building is shabby on exterior, looks neglected. Cemetery needs professional restoration and improved landscaping, new fence and old gate should be repaired and refitted with padlock. Pioneer heritage site of local interest and genealogical importance.
SAGUENAY-LAC-SAINT-JEAN
154- QC000033301047 The Catholic Cemetery looks after this small historic cemetery.
155- QC00002.523.58038.5 The cemetery association is essentially dormant, and the cemetery is run by one or two volunteers, i.e., a treasurer and a president, both of whom are getting elderly. Recently, the cemetery appealed to descendants of those buried for donations. The response was fairly generous, but funding was allocated to help with regular upkeep (mowing, etc.), not with repairs to headstones. Vandalism is a serious problem, though the situation seems to have improved lately. About 50% of the stones, however, require repairs, re-setting, etc., as a result of being knocked over by vandals, but the funding is not available, since funds go to basic maintenance ($2,700 for 13 mowings in 2007). Records and a map are in good order.
156- QC0000------------ No other information
157- QC0000------------ The remains in the early Protestant cemetery were transferred to Grande-Baie Protestant Cemetery in 1940.
OUTAOUAIS
158- QC00001 Only 2 very competent but older volunteers- great concerns for future and need help now.1 Elderly women8 Memorial fund: families give donations. Seems to have an adequate amount of money. 0 No map – some records burned in fire in parish centre at Namur.0 Very isolated area; church has had several thefts, no houses around, easy access from road.31 A partly seasonal, but active small community at present but with concerns for the future. Trouble finding information re: history, records of cemetery, etc. Not much help from United Church organization. At risk because site is dependent on a few, aging local residents and a few second home occasional residents. No one seems to have much accurate information.
159- QC0000------------ --

FINDINGS ( OTHER CEMETERIES REVIEWED BUT NOT AT RISK):

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FINDINGS ( end Cemeteries):

APPENDIX: INSTRUCTIONS TO INVENTORY TAKERS:

Page 1 (General Information):


--Address / Directions: provide precise address if possible, directions if necessary.
--History: a very brief description of the cemetery’s origins.
--Legal owner (i.e., who holds title to the cemetery?). If the cemetery is on private property, please specify current owners, if available. If the landowners are not known, write “private property.”
--Custodian. This refers to who actually maintains the cemetery. The custodian and the legal owner may be one and the same. However, the custodian may also be a person(s) or organization mandated to manage the cemetery on behalf of the owner (e.g., a local historical society may look after a graveyard that is on private land). If a cemetery is completely abandoned, please write “abandoned.”
--Governance structure refers to the type of management – i.e., is the cemetery managed by a corporation, a volunteer association, a private landowner, etc.
--Number of burials refers to the number of persons interred – not the number of existing headstones
--Where information is lacking, type Not Available.

Pages 2-3 (Grading System):

Please provide grades for each sub-category. The higher the grade, the better the condition of the cemetery. The total is based on 100 points.
--Condition of grounds. These sub-categories are fairly straightforward.
--Condition of Gravestones:
--Overall condition. Look for stones that are broken, cracked, bending, eroding, splitting, poorly repaired, partly buried, lying on the ground, overgrown with vegetation, etc. (Note: lichen growth is not usually considered harmful to stones)
--Legibility. Look for damage from erosion, pollution, breakage and other factors.
--Effected repairs have employed proper conservation techniques. This is perhaps the most difficult category to evaluate. Some conservation practices are difficult to detect without training. However, obvious things to look for would include: frequent use of iron brackets (causing damage from expansion, cracking and rust); poor or over-application of mortar to fill cracks or repair breaks; embedding of gravestones in cement bases; replacement of original stones with modern stones; removal of stones from their original locations; severely leaning gravestones (causing stress to the stone); piled or discarded gravestones; re-engraving or painting of original inscriptions on gravestones; etc.
--Management. In general, the better organized the management structure, the better the long-term outlook for the cemetery. Eg. An incorporated association implies an organized structure, regular meetings, funding, etc. In some cases, local heritage groups and municipalities make capable managers, as well. However, cemeteries that depend on a loose and fluctuating committee of volunteers (some or many of them quite elderly) have no guarantee of long-term survival. And those with no management whatsoever (i.e., abandoned graveyards or family plots) have the least promising outlook.
--Level of involvement. Are cemetery volunteers or caretakers elderly? Are younger members involved? Is the local community vibrant enough to produce new members over time?
--Endowment; funding. What is the financial health of the cemetery? Are there interest-generating investments? Does the management hold regular fundraising activities?
--Records. Most active cemeteries have a map of all the burial plots. How accurate and up-to-date are the records? Are they kept in a safe place? Are they accessible to the public? Many inactive cemeteries have few or no records.
--Other threats. A whole host of other threats may fall into this category.
--Feel free to make other comments or recommendations.